Etymology
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Yank (n.)

abbreviated form of Yankee, 1778.

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tho (conj.)

in modern use, an abbreviated spelling of though.

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beaut (n.)

1866, abbreviated form of beauty in the sense of "a beautiful thing or person."

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phage (n.)

virus that destroys bacteria, 1917, an abbreviated form of bacteriophage.

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short-hair (n.)

type of domestic cat, by 1890, abbreviated from short-hair cat, from short (adj.) + hair (n.).

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sub voce 

Latin, literally "under the word or heading." A common dictionary reference, usually abbreviated s.v.

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curriculum vitae (n.)

"brief account of one's life and work," 1902, Latin, literally "course of one's life" (see curriculum + vital). Abbreviated c.v.

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vibe (n.)

1940, short for vibraphone; attested from 1967 as an abbreviated form of vibration in the 1960s slang sense of "instinctive feeling." Related: Vibes.

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id est 

Latin, literally "that is (to say)," from id "that," neuter of is, from PIE pronominal stem *i- (see yon). For est, see is. Usually abbreviated i.e. "to write, or even to say, this in the full instead of in the abbreviated form is now so unusual as to convict one of affectation" [Fowler]. It introduces another way to say something already said, not an example of it (which is e.g.).

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