Etymology
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transit (n.)
Origin and meaning of transit

mid-15c., "act or fact of passing across or through," from Latin transitus "a going over, passing over, passage," verbal noun from past participle of transire "cross over, go over, pass over, hasten over, pass away," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). Meaning "a transit of a planet across the sun" is from 1660s. Meaning "public transportation" is attested from 1873.

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number (v.)

c. 1300, "to count," from Old French nombrer "to count, reckon," from nombre (n.) "number" (see number (n.)). Meaning "to assign a distinctive number to" is late 14c.; that of "to ascertain the number of" is from early 15c. Related: Numbered; numbering.

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number (n.)

c. 1300, "sum, aggregate of a collection," from Anglo-French noumbre, Old French nombre and directly from Latin numerus "a number, quantity," from PIE root *nem- "assign, allot; take."

Meaning "written symbol or figure of arithmetic value" is from late 14c. Meaning "single (numbered) issue of a magazine" is from 1795. Colloquial sense of "a person or thing" is by 1894. Meaning "dialing combination to reach a particular telephone receiver" is from 1879; hence wrong number (1886). The modern meaning "musical selection" (1885) is from vaudeville theater programs, where acts were marked by a number. Earlier numbers meant "metrical sound or utterance, measured or harmonic expression" (late 15c.) and, from 1580s, "poetical measure, poetry, verse."

Number one "oneself" is from 1704 (mock-Italian form numero uno attested from 1973); the biblical Book of Numbers (c. 1400, Latin Numeri, Greek Arithmoi) is so called because it begins with a census of the Israelites. Childish slang number one and number two for "urination" and "defecation" attested from 1902. Number cruncher is 1966, of machines; 1971 of persons. To get or have (someone's) number "have someone figured out" is attested from 1853; to say one's number is up (1806) meaning "one's time has come" is a reference to the numbers on a lottery, draft, etc. The numbers "illegal lottery" is from 1897, American English.

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aba (n.)

outer garment of coarse, woolen stuff, of a type worn in Arabia and Syria, 1811, from Arabic. Also of the cloth it is made from (often goat or camel hair).

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transit (v.)
Origin and meaning of transit

mid-15c., from Latin transitus, past participle of transire "cross over, go over, pass over, hasten over, pass away," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). Astronomical sense is from 1680s. Related: Transited; transiting.

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in-transit (adj.)

1907, from commercial verbal phrase in transit "on the way or passage, while passing from one to another" (1819, earlier in Latin form in transitu), from in + transit (n.).

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cardinal number (n.)

1590s, "one, two, three," etc. as opposed to ordinal numbers "first, second, third," etc.; so called because they are the principal numbers and the ordinals depend on them (see cardinal (adj.)).

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sic transit gloria mundi 

c. 1600, Latin phrase, literally "thus passes the glory of the world;" perhaps an alteration of a passage in Thomas à Kempis's "Imitatio Christi" (1471).

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chain-gang (n.)

"a number of slaves or convicts chained together outdoors doing labor or during transit," 1816, from chain (n.) + gang (n.). 

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paratransit (n.)

also para-transit, "public transportation of a flexible, informal kind" (such as taxis, carpools, etc.), 1973, from para- (1) + transit.

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