Etymology
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Ananias 
"liar," a reference to Acts v.1-5.
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omer (n.)

Hebrew measure of capacity (a little over 5 pints), 1610s, from Hebrew 'omer.

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Nembutal 

type of barbiturate, originally used to calm patients before anesthesia and operation, 1930, proprietary name of pentobarbitone sodium, formed from letters and syllables from N(a) "sodium" + full chemical name 5-ethyl-5-1-methylbutyl barbiturate.

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wayside (n.)
"the side of the road," c. 1400, from way (n.) + side (n.). To fall by the wayside is from Luke viii.5.
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port-wine (n.)

"dark red wine, port," 1700, from port (n.5) + wine (n.).

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holier-than-thou 
as an adjectival phrase in reference to supercilious sanctimony attested by 1888, American English. The text is in Isaiah lxv.5.
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gateau (n.)
1845, from French gâteau "cake," from Old French gastel, from Frankish *wastil "cake," from Proto-Germanic *was-tilaz, from PIE *wes- (5) "to eat, consume."
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head-butt (n.)
also headbutt, 1935, from head (n.) + butt (n.5). As a verb, by 1946. Related: Head-butting (1917 as a noun).
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ecce homo 
Latin, literally "behold the man" (John xix.5), from Latin ecce "lo!, behold!" Christ crowned with thorns, especially as the subject of a painting.
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pulsive (adj.)

c. 1600, "impulsive, propulsive," from past-participle stem of Latin pellere "to drive, strike" (from PIE root *pel- (5) "to thrust, strike, drive").  By 1960 as "making a beating or throbbing sound." Related: Pulsively; pulsiveness.

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