Etymology
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-ward 

adverbial suffix expressing direction, Old English -weard "toward," literally "turned toward," sometimes -weardes, with genitive singular ending of neuter adjectives, from Proto-Germanic *werda- (cognates: Old Saxon, Old Frisian -ward, Old Norse -verðr), variant of PIE *werto- "to turn, wind," from root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend." The original notion is of "turned toward."

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Godward (adv.)
also God-ward, "toward God," late 14c., from God + -ward.
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westward (adv.)
"toward the west," Old English westweard; see west + -ward.
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heavenward (adv.)
mid-13c., from heaven + -ward. Related: Heavenwards.
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windward (adj.)
"on the side toward which the wind blows," 1540s, from wind (n.1) + -ward.
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ward (n.)

Old English weard "a guarding, protection; watchman, sentry, keeper," from Proto-Germanic *wardaz "guard" (source also of Old Saxon ward, Old Norse vörðr, Old High German wart), from PIE *war-o-, suffixed form of root *wer- (3) "perceive, watch out for."

Used for administrative districts (at first in the sense of guardianship) from late 14c.; of hospital divisions from 1749. Meaning "minor under control of a guardian" is from early 15c. Ward-heeler is 1890, from heeler "loafer, one on the lookout for shady work" (1870s).

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