Etymology
Advertisement
-teen 
word-forming element making cardinal numbers from 13 to 19, meaning "ten more than," from Old English -tene, -tiene, from Proto-Germanic *tekhuniz (cognates: Old Saxon -tein, Dutch -tien, Old High German -zehan, German -zehn, Gothic -taihun), an inflected form of the root of ten; cognate with Latin -decim (source of Italian -dici, Spanish -ce, French -ze).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
teen (n.)
"teen-aged person," 1818 (but rare before 20c.), from -teen. As an adjective meaning "of or for teen-agers," from 1947.
Related entries & more 
pre-teen (adj.)

also preteen, "just prior to one's teenage years," 1926, from pre- + teen. As a noun, "pre-teen person," from 1962. Sub-teen (1944) also was used.

Related entries & more 
umpteen (adj.)
by 1907, popularized in World War I army slang, from umpty + -teen. Related: Umpteenth.
Related entries & more 
teeny-bopper (n.)

also teenybopper, 1966, from teen (n.) but also felt as influenced by teeny. For second element, see bop.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
teens (n.)
1670s (plural), "teen-age years of a person," formed from -teen taken as a separate word. As "decade of years comprising numbers ending in -teen," from 1889.
Related entries & more 
teenage (adj.)
also teen age, teen-age; 1911, from teen + age (n.). Originally in reference to Sunday School classes. Teen-aged (adj.) is from 1922.
Related entries & more 
quatorze 

in French terms, "fourteen," from French quatorze, from Latin quatuordecim (source also of Italian quattordici), from quatuor "four" (see four) + -decim (see -teen).

Related entries & more 
-teenth 
word-forming element making ordinal numbers from 13 to 19, from -teen + -th (1), displacing Old English -teoða, -teoðe (West Saxon), related to teogoða (Anglian) "tenth."
Related entries & more 
teenager (n.)
also teen ager, teen-ager; 1922, derived noun from teenage (q.v.). The earlier word for this was teener, attested in American English from 1894, and teen had been used as a noun to mean "teen-aged person" in 1818, though this was not common before 20c.
Related entries & more