Etymology
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-machy 

word-forming element meaning "battle, war, contest, fighting, warfare," from Latinized form of Greek -makhia, from makhe "a battle, fight," related to makhesthai "to fight." Beekes suspects it is from an isolated root, perhaps Pre-Greek: "In the domain of fighting and battle, old inherited expressions can hardly be expected."

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tauromachy (n.)
"bull-fighting," 1830, from Greek tauromakhia; see Taurus + -machy.
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alectryomachy (n.)
also alectoromachy, "cock-fighting," 1650s, from Latinized form of Greek alektryon "cock" (see alectryomancy) + -machy.
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Andromache 

wife of Hector, Latin Andromache, from Greek Andromakhē, perhaps literally "whose husband excels in fighting," fem. of andromakhos "fighting with men;" see anthropo- + -machy.

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logomachy (n.)
"contention about, or with, words," 1560s, a nativized Latinized form of New Testament Greek logomakhia "a war about words," from logomakhos (see logo- + -machy). Related: Logomach; logomachical.
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iconoclasm (n.)
1797 in reference to an act of breaking or destroying idols physically; figuratively from 1858 in reference to beliefs, cherished institutions, etc.; see iconoclast. An older word for it was iconomachy (1580s), from Greek eikonomakhia (see -machy).
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Telemachus 

son of Odysseus and Penelope, from Latinized form of Greek Telemakhos, literally "fighting from afar," from tele "from afar" (from PIE root *kwel- (2) "far" in space or time) + makhe "a battle, fight" (see -machy).

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sciamachy (n.)
"fighting with shadows, shadow-boxing" 1620s, from Greek skiamakhia "shadow-fighting, a sham fight" but perhaps literally "fighting in the shade" (i.e., in school; ancient teachers taught in shaded public places such as porches and groves), from skia "shade, shadow" (see Ascians) + makhe "battle" (see -machy).
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promachos (n.)

"a champion, one who fights on behalf of another," by 1905, from Latinized form of Greek promakhos "a deity (especially Athene or Apollo) who fights before some person, army, or state as a protector or guardian," from pro "before" (see pro-) + makhesthai "to fight" (see -machy). The word is attested from 1871 in reference to the colossal bronze statue of Athene Promachos that stood in the Athenian citadel.

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