Etymology
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-logy 

word-forming element meaning "a speaking, discourse, treatise, doctrine, theory, science," from Greek -logia (often via French -logie or Medieval Latin -logia), from -log-, combining form of legein "to speak, tell;" thus, "the character or deportment of one who speaks or treats of (a certain subject);" from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')." Often via Medieval Latin -logia, French -logie. In philology "love of learning; love of words or discourse," apology, doxology, analogy, trilogy, etc., Greek logos "word, speech, statement, discourse" is directly concerned.

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loggy (adj.)
"heavy, sluggish," 1847; see logy. Related: Logginess.
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chromatology (n.)

"the science of colors," 1846; see chromato- + -logy.

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logy (adj.)
also loggy, "dull and heavy," 1847, American English, perhaps from Dutch log "heavy, dull" + -y (2); compare Middle Low German luggich "sleepy, sluggish." Or perhaps a variant of loggy.
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iconology (n.)
"study of icons," 1736; see icon + -logy.
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bibliology (n.)
"book-lore," 1804, from French bibliologie; see biblio- + -logy. By 1871 as "Biblical literature."
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seismology (n.)
1852, from seismo- + -logy. Related: Seismological (1850).
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oology (n.)

"the study of birds' eggs," 1823, from oo- "egg" + -logy "study of." Related: Oological; oologist.

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