Etymology
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-iatric 
word-forming element, from Latinized form of Greek iatrikos "healing," from iatros "physician, healer" (related to iatreun "treat medically," and iasthai "heal, treat"); of uncertain origin, perhaps from iaomai "to cure," related to iaino "heat, warm, cheer," probably from a root meaning "enliven, animate."
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pediatric (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the medical care or diseases of children," 1849, from Latinized form of Greek paid-, stem of pais "child" (see pedo-) + -iatric.

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iatro- 
word-forming element meaning "a physician; medicine; healing," from Greek iatros "healer, physician" (see -iatric).
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-iatry 
word-forming element meaning "medical treatment," from French -iatrie, from Greek iatreia "healing, medical treatment" (see -iatric).
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bariatric (adj.)

"of or pertaining to obesity," 1976, from Greek baros "weight, a weight, burden," related to barys "heavy" (from PIE root *gwere- (1) "heavy") + -iatric.

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geriatric (adj.)

1909, formed in English from Latinized forms of Greek gēras, gērōs "old age" (from PIE root *gere- (1) "to grow old") + iatrikos "of a physician," from iatros (see -iatric).

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Jason 
masc. proper name, from Greek Eason, from Hebrew Yehoshua, a common name among Hellenistic Jews (see Joshua). In Greek mythology, son of Aeson, leader of the Argonauts, from Latin Jason, from Greek Iason, perhaps related to iasthai "to heal" (see -iatric). The names were somewhat merged in Christian Greek.
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psychiatry (n.)

"the medical treatment of mental diseases," 1846, from French psychiatrie, from Medieval Latin psychiatria, literally "a healing of the soul," from Latinized form of Greek psykhē "mind" (see psyche) + iatreia "healing, care" (see -iatric).

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panacea (n.)

"universal remedy," 1540s, from Latin panacea, a herb (variously identified) that would heal all illnesses, from Greek panakeia "cure-all," from panakēs "all-healing," from pan- "all" (see pan-) + akos "cure," from iasthai "to heal" (see -iatric). Earlier in English as panace (1510s).

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podiatry (n.)
1914, formed from Greek pod-, stem of pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot") + iatreia "healing," from iatros "physician" (see -iatric). An attempt to supplant chiropody (see chiropodist) and distance the practice from the popular impression of unskilled corn-cutters. The National Association of Chiropodists changed its name to American Podiatry Association in 1958. Related: Podiatric; podiatrist.
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