Etymology
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-ia 
word-forming element in names of countries, diseases, and flowers, from Latin and Greek -ia, noun ending, in Greek especially used in forming abstract nouns (typically of feminine gender); see -a (1). The classical suffix in its usual evolution (via French -ie) comes to Modern English as -y (as in familia/family, also -logy, -graphy). Compare -cy.

In paraphernalia, Mammalia, regalia, etc. it represents Latin or Greek -a (see -a (2)), plural suffix of nouns in -ium (Latin) or -ion (Greek), with formative or euphonic -i-.
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psychedelia (n.)

"the subculture associated with users of psychedelic drugs; psychedelic phenomena collectively," 1967, from psychedelic + -ia.

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hypoxia (n.)
1941, from hypo- + oxygen + abstract noun ending -ia. Related: Hypoxic.
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suburbia (n.)
1876, from suburb + -ia, perhaps on the model of utopia.
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Arabia 
1711; see Arab + -ia. The older name for "the country of Arabia" was Araby (late 13c.).
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Turkey 
country name, late 14c., from Medieval Latin Turchia, from Turcus (see Turk) + -ia.
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Alexandria 
city in Egypt, founded 332 B.C.E. by Alexander the Great, for whom it is named. Also see -ia. Related: Alexandrian.
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hyperthermia (n.)
1878, medical Latin, from hyper- "over, exceedingly, to excess" + Greek therme "heat" (see thermal) + abstract noun ending -ia.
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Nigeria 

West African nation, named for river Niger, which runs through it, + country name ending -ia. Related: Nigerian.

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gardenia (n.)
shrub genus, 1757, Modern Latin, named for Scottish-born American naturalist Dr. Alexander Garden (1730-1791), Vice President of the Royal Society, + abstract noun ending -ia.
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