Etymology
Advertisement
-ess 
fem. suffix, from French -esse, from Late Latin -issa, from Greek -issa (cognate with Old English fem. agent suffix -icge); rare in classical Greek but more common later, in diakonissa "deaconess" and other Church terms picked up by Latin.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
enchantress (n.)
late 14c., "witch," from enchanter + -ess. Meaning "charming woman" is from 1713.
Related entries & more 
maness (n.)

"woman as the feminine of man," 1590s, from man (n.) + -ess.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
anchoress (n.)
"female recluse, nun," late 14c.; see anchorite + -ess.
Related entries & more 
ogress (n.)

"a female ogre," 1713; see ogre + -ess.

Related entries & more