Etymology
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-ed 

past-participle suffix of weak verbs, from Old English -ed, -ad, -od (leveled to -ed in Middle English), from Proto-Germanic *-da- (cognates: Old High German -ta, German -t, Old Norse -þa, Gothic -da, -þs), from PIE *-to-, "suffix forming adjectives marking the accomplishment of the notion of the base" [Watkins] (cognates: Sanskrit -tah, Greek -tos, Latin -tus; see -th (1)).

Originally fully pronounced, as still in beloved (which, with blessed, accursed, and a few others retains the full pronunciation through liturgical readings). In Old English already the first and third person singular past tense form of some "weak" verbs was -te, a variant of -de (see -ed), often accompanied by a change in vowel sound (as in modern keep/kept, sleep/slept).

A tendency to shorten final consonants has left English with many past tense forms spelled in -ed but pronounced "-t" (looked, missed, etc.). In some older words both forms exist, with different shades of meaning, as in gilded/gilt, burned/burnt.

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intentioned (adj.)
"having intentions" (of a specified kind), 16c., from intention + -ed.
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edible (adj.)

1590s, from Late Latin edibilis "eatable," from Latin edere "to eat," from PIE root *ed- "to eat."

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*ed- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to eat," originally "to bite." 

It forms all or part of: alfalfa; anodyne; comedo; comestible; eat; edacious; edible; escarole; esculent; esurient; etch; ettin; fret (v.); frass; jotun; obese; obesity; ort; postprandial; prandial.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit admi "I eat;" Avestan ad- "to eat;" Greek edo "I eat;" Latin edere "to eat;" Lithuanian ėdu "I eat," ėdžioti "to devour, bite;" Hittite edmi "I eat," adanna "food;" Armenian utem "I eat;" Old Church Slavonic jasti "to eat," Russian jest "to eat;" Old Irish ithim "I eat;" Gothic itan, Old Swedish and Old English etan, Old High German essan "to eat."  

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escarole (n.)

"lettuce-like salad vegetable" (a type of endive), 1897, from French escarole (13c., scariole), from Italian scariola, from Medieval Latin escariola "something edible," ultimately from Latin edere "to eat" (from PIE root *ed- "to eat").

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ettin (n.)

an old word for "a giant," extinct since 16c., from Old English eoten "giant, monster," from Proto-Germanic *itunoz "giant" (source also of Old Norse iotunn, Danish jætte), perhaps "immense eater," or "man-eater," from suffixed form of PIE root *ed- "to eat."

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esculent (adj.)

edible, fit to be used for food," "1620s, from Latin esculentus "good to eat, eatable, fit to eat," from esca "food," from PIE *eds-qa- (source also of Lithuanian ėska "appetite"), from root *ed- "to eat." As a noun from 1620s, "food, especially vegetables."

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edacious (adj.)

"given to eating, voracious," 1736, from Latin edaci-, stem of edax "voracious, gluttonous," from edere "to eat" (from PIE root *ed- "to eat") + -ous. Related: Edacity (1620s); edaciously; edaciousness.

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esurient (adj.)

"inclined to eat," 1670s, from Latin esurientem (nominative esuriens), present participle of esurire "be hungry, hunger, desire to eat," from stem of edere "to eat" (from PIE root *ed- "to eat"). Related: Esurience; esuriency.

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op-ed (adj.)

by 1931, in reference to the page of a newspaper opposite the editorial page, usually devoted to personal opinion columns and criticism. The thing itself dates to 1921 at the New York "World" and was the brainchild of editor Herbert Bayard Swope, whose op-ed pages launched the celebrity of many of the Algonquin Round Table writers.

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