Etymology
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-dom 

abstract suffix of state, from Old English dom "statute, judgment" (see doom (n.)). Originally an independent word, but already active as a suffix in Old English (as in freodom, wisdom). Cognate with German -tum (Old High German tuom). "Jurisdiction," hence "province, state, condition, quality."

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chiefdom (n.)

1570s, "sovereignty," from chief (n.) + -dom.

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thraldom (n.)
also thralldom, c. 1200; see thrall + -dom.
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fandom (n.)
"the realm of avid enthusiasts," 1903, from fan (n.2) + -dom.
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dukedom (n.)

"a duchy," mid-15c., from duke + -dom.

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niggerdom (n.)

"Negroes collectively," by 1855; see nigger + -dom.

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catdom (n.)

"cats generally, the realm of cats," 1853, from cat (n.) + -dom.

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officialdom (n.)

"officials collectively or as a class," often disparaging, 1863, from official (n.) + -dom.

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