Etymology
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-ard 
also -art, from Old French -ard, -art, from German -hard, -hart "hardy," forming the second element in many personal names, often used as an intensifier, but in Middle High German and Dutch used as a pejorative element in common nouns, and thus passing into Middle English in bastard, coward, blaffard ("one who stammers"), etc. It thus became a living element in English, as in buzzard, drunkard. The German element is from Proto-Germanic *-hart/*-hard "bold, hardy," from PIE root *kar- "hard."
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blinkard (n.)
a mocking term for a person with bad eyesight, c. 1500, from blink (v.) + -ard. Figuratively, "one who lacks intellectual perception" (1520s).
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laggard (adj.)
1702, "slow, sluggish," from lag (v.) + -ard. From 1757 as a noun, "one who lags, a shirker, loiterer." Related: Laggardly.
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staggard (n.)
"stag in its fourth year," thus not quite full-grown, c. 1400, from stag + -ard.
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dullard (n.)

"stupid person, dunce, simpleton," mid-15c. (but early 13c. as a surname), from dull (adj.) + -ard.

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bollard (n.)
1844, originally a strong, upright post along a dock for fixing hawsers for mooring ships; since 1948, usually a traffic control device; probably from bole + suffix -ard.
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pollard (n.)

1540s, "de-horned animal," from poll (v.2) + -ard. In reference to trees cut back nearly to the trunk, from 1610s. Such trees form a dense head of spreading branches, which can be cut for basket-making, etc.

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drunkard (n.)

"person who is frequently inebriated, one given to excessive use of strong drink," 1520s, droncarde, but probably older (attested from late 13c. as a surname, Mauricius Druncard), from Middle English dronken, participial adjective from drink, + -ard.

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vizard (n.)
"mask," 1550s, altered form of vysar, viser (see visor), by influence of words in -ard. Figurative use from 1570s; common 17c. Also applied to the person with the masks, and used as a verb meaning "to conceal." Related: Vizarded; vizarding.
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palliard (n.)

late 15c., "vagabond or beggar" (who sleeps on straw in barns), from French paillard, from Old French paillart "tramp, beggar, vagabond, dissolute person" (13c.), from paille "straw" (see pallet (n.1); also see -ard). Related: Palliardry. Palliardize was 17c. English for "to fornicate."

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