Etymology
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-ade 

word-forming element denoting an action or product of an action, via French, Spanish, or Italian, ultimately from Latin -ata, fem. past participle ending used in forming nouns. The usual form in French is -ée. The parallel form, -ade, came into French about the 13c. via southern Romanic languages (Spanish, Portuguese, and Provençal -ada, Italian -ata), hence grenade, crusade, ballad, arcade, comrade, balustrade, lemonade, etc.

This foreign suffix ade has been so largely imported, and at a time when the French language had still a certain plastic force, that it has been adopted as a popular suffix, and is still employed to form a crowd of new words, such as promenade, embrassade, glissade, bourrade, &c. [Brachet, "Etymological Dictionary of the French Language," Kitchin transl., Oxford, 1882]

Latin -atus, past-participle suffix of verbs of the 1st conjugation, also became -ade in French (Spanish -ado, Italian -ato) and came to be used as a suffix denoting persons or groups participating in an action (such as brigade, desperado).

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defilade (n.)

"arrangement in fortification to protect the lines from enfilading fire," 1828, from defile (n.) + -ade. Related: Defilading.

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chiffonade (n.)

also chiffonnade, food preparation technique, 1847, from French chiffonade, from chiffon (see chiffon) + -ade. In reference to the condition of the leafy stuff after it is so treated.

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gasconade (n.)
"a boast, boastful talk, bluster," 1709, from French gasconade (see Gascon + -ade); from gasconner (16c.) "to boast, brag," literally "to talk like a Gascon." As a verb in English from 1727.
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-ado 
in commando, desperado, tornado, and other words of Spanish and Portuguese origin, "person or group participating in an action," from Latin -atus, past participle suffix of verbs of the first conjugation (see -ade).
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oeillade (n.)
"an oogling stare, an amorous gaze," 1590s, from French oeillide (15c.), from oeil "eye" (from Latin oculus, from PIE root *okw- "to see") + -ade.
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lemonade (n.)
1660s, nativized from French limonade (17c.), which is from Italian limonata or else a French formation from limon; see lemon (n.1) + -ade. The earlier English spelling was lemonado (c. 1640) with false Spanish ending.
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cannonade (n.)
"a continued discharge of artillery," 1650s, from cannon + -ade. As a verb, "attack with artillery," from 1660s. Compare French canonnade (16c.), Italian cannonata. Related: Cannonaded; cannonading.
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blockade (n.)
"the shutting up of a place by hostile ships or troops," 1690s, from block (v.1) + -ade, false French ending (the French word is blocus, 18c. in this sense, which seems to be in part a back-formation from the verb bloquer and in part influenced by Middle Dutch blokhuus; see blockhouse). Blockade-runner is from 1863.
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colonnade (n.)

in architecture, "a series of columns placed at certain intervals," 1718, from French colonnade, from Italian colonnato, from colonna "column," from Latin columna "pillar," collateral form of columen "top, summit," from PIE root *kel- (2) "to be prominent; hill." Also see -ade. Related: Colonnaded.

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