Etymology
Advertisement
Advertisement
time-span (n.)
also timespan, 1897, from time (n.) + span (n.1).
Related entries & more 
strapping (adj.)

"tall and sturdy, robust," originally applied to women, 1650s, from present participle of strap (v.), apparently in the sense of "to beat with a strap." Compare similar senses of whopping, spanking, bouncing and other present-participle adjectives of violent action expressing something large in size.

Related entries & more 
lifespan (n.)
also life-span, 1918, from life (n.) + span (n.1).
Related entries & more 
wingspan (n.)
also wing-span, 1894, from wing (n.) + span (n.1).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
papish (adj.)

1540s; regarded in Century Dictionary and other sources as a "corrupt or dialectal form of papist."

Related entries & more 
lusterless (adj.)

"without luster," 1796, from luster (n.1)  + -less.

Related entries & more 
package (v.)

"to bundle up into a pack or package," 1915, from package (n.). Related: Packaged; packaging.

Related entries & more 
mandibular (adj.)

"of, pertaining to, or of the nature of a mandible," 1650s, from Latin mandibula (see mandible) + -ar.

Related entries & more 
consanguine (adj.)

"descended from a common ancestor," c. 1600, from French consanguin (14c.), from Latin consanguineus "of the same blood," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sanguineus "of blood" (see sanguinary).

Related entries & more