Etymology
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wrap-up (n.)
"summary," 1947, from the verbal phrase (see wrap (v.)).
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flare-up (n.)

"a sudden burst," 1827 of an argument; 1858 of light, from verbal phrase; see flare (v.) + up (adv.). It seems to have had some vogue as a street expression in London in the 1830s.

Flare up! flare up! is all the cry, in every square and street —
No other sound salutes your ear, whoe'er you chance to meet
Where'er you ride, or walk, or sit, or breakfast, dine, or sup,
They welcome you or quiz you with "Flare up, my boy! flare up!"
[Fraser's Magazine, April 1834]
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crack-up (n.)

1926, in reference to airplane crashes; 1936, "disintegration under stress, mental collapse" [Fitzgerald]; from the verbal phrase, from crack (v.) + up (adv.). The verbal phrase in the meaning "to break up laughing" is by 1967, transitive and intransitive. Its earliest sense was "to praise extravagantly" (as in not all it's cracked up to be).

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conscript (adj.)

mid-15c., "registered, enrolled," from Latin conscriptus "enrolled, chosen, elect," past participle of conscribere "to draw up, list," literally "to write together" from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut").

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rewrite (v.)

1560s, "reply in writing," from re- "back, again" + write (v.). The sense of "write again, write a second time" especially in a different form is by 1730. Related: Rewrote; rewritten; rewriting. The newspaper rewrite man, who works up copy for publication from information or stories phoned or sent in by reporters, is recorded from 1901. As a noun, "act of revising copy or a text," from 1926.

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postscribe (v.)

"write after, write as a postscript," 1610s, a back-formation from postscript or else from Latin postscribere "write after."

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cipher (v.)

also cypher, 1520s, "to do arithmetic" (with Arabic numerals), from cipher (n.). Transitive sense "reckon in figures, cast up" is from 1860. Meaning "to write in code or occult characters" is from 1560s. Related: Ciphered; ciphering.

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overwrite (v.)
1690s, "to write over other writing," from over- + write (v.). Of computers, it is attested from 1959. Meaning "to write too elaborately or ornately" is from 1923. Related: Overwriting; overwritten.
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rescribe (v.)

"to write back, write in reply," mid-15c., rescriben, from Latin rescribere, from re- "back" (see re-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). Now archaic or obsolete. Related: Rescribed; rescribing; rescript; rescription.

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hand-written (adj.)
also handwritten, 1745, from hand (n.) + past participle of write (v.). As a verb, hand-write is recorded from 1878, probably a back-formation.
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