Etymology
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Liebfraumilch (n.)
German white wine, 1833, from German, literally "milk of Our Lady."
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blancmange (n.)
"jelly-like preparation in cookery," late 14c., from Old French blancmengier (13c.), literally "white eating," originally a dish of fowl minced with cream, rice, almonds, sugar, eggs, etc.; from blanc "white" (also used in Old French of white foods, such as eggs, cream, also white meats such as veal and chicken; see blank (adj.)) + mangier "to eat" (see manger). Attempts were made nativize it (Chaucer has blankemangere); French pronunciation is evident in 18c. variant blomange, and "the present spelling is a half attempt at restoring the French" [OED].
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ceratosaurus (n.)

meat-eating dinosaur of the Jurassic period, 1884, from cerato- "horn" + -saurus. So called for the small horn on its nose.

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Ann 

fem. proper name, alternative form of Anna, from Latin Anna, from Greek, from Hebrew Hannah (see Hannah). In African-American vernacular, "white woman," also "a black woman who is considered to be acting 'too white;' " also Miss Ann (by 1926). She is the spouse of Mr. Charlie.

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leuko- 
before vowels leuk-, also sometimes in Latinized form leuco-/leuc-, word-forming element used from 19c. and meaning "white" (or, in medicine, "leukocyte"), from Greek leukos "clear, white," from PIE *leuko-, suffixed form of root *leuk- "light, brightness."
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argentine (adj.)
mid-15c., "silver-colored;" c. 1500, "of or resembling silver," from Old French argentin (12c.), from Latin argentinus "of silver," from argentum "silver," from PIE root *arg- "to shine; white," hence "silver" as the shining or white metal.
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auburn (adj.)
early 15c., "whitish, yellowish-white, flaxen-colored," from Old French auborne, from Medieval Latin alburnus "off-white, whitish," from Latin albus "white" (see alb). Meaning shifted 16c. to "reddish-brown" under influence of Middle English brun "brown" (see brown (adj.)) which also changed the spelling. Since the sense-shift it has generally been limited to hair. As a noun by 1852.
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sterol (n.)
"white, crystalline substance discovered in gallstones," 1913, abstracted from cholesterol.
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Parian (adj.)

"of or pertaining to Paros," one of the Cyclades, famous for its white marble.

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bialy (n.)
bagel with onion flakes sprinkled on it, by 1936, ultimately short for Białystok, city in modern Poland. The city is named for the Biała river (literally White River), that flows past it, from Polish biały "white" + stok "slope."
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