Etymology
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Wellington (n.)
boot so called from 1817, for Arthur, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769-1852), who also in his lifetime had a style of coat, hat, and trousers named for him as well as a variety of apple and pine tree.
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weltanschauung (n.)
1868 (William James), from German Weltanschauung, from welt "world" (see world) + anschauung "perception" (related to English show).
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go west (v.)
19c. British idiom for "die, be killed" (popularized during World War I), "probably from thieves' slang, wherein to go west meant to go to Tyburn, hence to be hanged, though the phrase has indubitably been influenced by the setting of the sun in the west" [Partridge]. Compare go south.
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weakling (n.)
1520s, coined by Tyndale from weak (adj.) + -ling as a loan-translation of Luther's Weichling "effeminate man" (from German weich "soft") in I Corinthians vi.9, where the Greek is malakoi, from malakos "soft, soft to the touch," "Like the Lat. mollis, metaph. and in a bad sense: effeminate, of a catamite, a male who submits his body to unnatural lewdness" ["Thayer's Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament"].
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Wehrmacht (n.)

"the armed forces of Germany," 1935, from German Wehrmacht (name of the armed forces 1921-1945), from Wehr "defense" (from PIE root *wer- (4) "to cover") + Macht "might" (from PIE root *magh- "to be able, have power").

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welkin (n.)

"sky" (poetic), Old English wolcen "cloud," also "sky, heavens," from Proto-Germanic *wulk- (source also of Old Saxon wolkan, Old Frisian wolken, Middle Dutch wolke, Dutch wolk, Old High German wolka, German Wolke "cloud"), perhaps from PIE *welg- "wet" (source also of Lithuanian vilgyti "to moisten," Old Church Slavonic vlaga "moisture," Czech vlhky "damp"); but Boutkan rejects this and finds no good IE etymology.

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well-wisher (n.)
1580s, from well (adv.) + agent noun from wish (v.). Well-wishing is recorded from 1560s.
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well-adjusted (adj.)
1735, in reference to mechanisms, etc., from well (adv.) + past participle of adjust (v.). In reference to emotional balance, recorded from 1959.
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weighty (adj.)
late 14c., "heavy;" late 15c., "important, serious, grave;" from weight (n.) + -y (2). Related: Weightiness.
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