Etymology
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caution (v.)

"to warn, exhort to take heed," 1640s, from caution (n.). Related: Cautioned; cautioning.

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animadvert (v.)
early 15c., "to take notice of," from Latin animadvertere "to notice, take cognizance of," also "to censure, blame, punish," literally "turn the mind to," from animus "the mind" (see animus) + advertere "turn to" (see advertise). Sense of "to criticize, blame, censure" in English is from 1660s. Related: Animadverted; animadverting.
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detract (v.)

early 15c., detracten, "disparage, defame, slander," from Latin detractus, past participle of detrahere "to take down, pull down, disparage," from de "down" (see de-) + trahere "to pull" (see tract (n.1)). Literal sense of "take away, withdraw" (c. 1500) is rare in English. Related: Detracted; detracting.

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revenge (v.)

late 14c., revengen, "avenge oneself," from Old French revengier, revenger, variants of revenchier "take revenge, avenge" (13c., Modern French revancher), from re-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see re-), + vengier "take revenge," from Latin vindicare "to lay claim to, avenge, punish" (see vindication). Transitive sense of "take vengeance on account of" is from early 15c. Related: Revenged; revenging; revengement.

To avenge is "to get revenge" or "to take vengeance"; it suggests the administration of just punishment for a criminal or immoral act. Revenge seems to stress the idea of retaliation a bit more strongly and implies real hatred as its motivation. ["The Columbia Guide to Standard American English," 1993]
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agreeance (n.)

1530s, from French agréance, noun of action from agréer "to please, satisfy; take pleasure in" (see agree).

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pregnable (adj.)

of a fortress, etc., "capable of being taken or won by force," 1530s, an alteration of Middle English preignable, earlier prenable (early 15c.), pernable (late 14c.), from Old French prenable, pregnauble "assailable, vulnerable," from stem of prendre "to take, grasp, seize," from Latin prehendere "to take hold of, to seize" (from prae- "before," see pre-, + -hendere, from PIE root *ghend- "to seize, take"). The form was confused in French and English by the influence of unrelated words from French preignaunt and English pregnant.

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assumpsit (n.)
"legal action for recovery of damages through breach of contract," legal Latin, literally "he has taken upon himself," perfect indicative of assumere "to take up, take to oneself" (see assume). The word embodies the allegation that the defendant promised or undertook to perform the specified act.
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waspish (adj.)
"irascible, quick to take offense; spiteful," 1560s, from wasp + -ish. Related: Waspishly; waspishness.
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remove (v.)

early 14c., remouven, remuvien, remēven, "take (something) away; dismiss" from an office, post or situation; from Old French removoir "move, stir; leave, depart; take away," from Latin removere "move back or away, take away, put out of view, subtract," from re- "back, away" (see re-) + movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away").

Sense of "go away, leave, depart, move" from a position occupied is from late 14c.; the intransitive sense of "change (one's) place, move from one place to another" also is from 14c. Related: Removed; removing.

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intercept (v.)
c. 1400, "to cut off" (a line), "prevent" (the spread of a disease), from Latin interceptus, past participle of intercipere "take or seize between, to seize in passing," from inter "between" (see inter-) + -cipere, combining form of capere "to take, catch," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp." Related: Intercepted; intercepting.
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