Etymology
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comfit (n.)

early 15c., confit, "sugarplum, sugary sweet, type of fruit or root preserved with sugar and dried," from Old French confit "preserved fruit," from Latin confectum, from confectionem, noun use of confectus, past participle of conficere "to prepare" (see confection). Forms with -m- appear from mid-15c.

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fennel (n.)

Old English fenol, finul, finol "fennel," perhaps via (or influenced by) Old French fenoil (13c.) or directly from Vulgar Latin *fenuculum, from Latin feniculum/faeniculum, diminutive of fenum/faenum "hay," probably literally "produce" (see fecund). Apparently so called from the hay-like appearance of its feathery green leaves and its sweet odor.

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saccharine (adj.)

1670s, "of or like sugar, having the qualities of sugar," from Medieval Latin saccharum "sugar," from Latin saccharon "sugar," from Greek sakkharon, from Pali sakkhara, from Sanskrit sarkara "gravel, grit" (see sugar). The metaphoric sense of "overly sweet" is recorded by 1841. For the sugar substitute, see saccharin. Related: Saccharinity.

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simnel (n.)
"sweet cake," c. 1200, from Old French simenel "fine wheat flour; flat bread cake, Lenten cake," probably by dissimilation from Vulgar Latin *siminellus (also source of Old High German semala "the finest wheat flour," German Semmel "a roll"), a diminutive of Latin simila "fine flour" (see semolina).
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angelic (adj.)

early 14c., "consisting of angels;" late 14c., "like or befitting an angel;" mid-15c., "pertaining to angels," from Old French angelique "angelic" (13c., Modern French angélique), from Latin angelicus, from Greek angelikos "angelic," from angelos (see angel). The sense of "wonderfully pure, sweet" is recorded from early 16c. Related: Angelically.

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figgy (adj.)

also figgey, 1540s "sweet" (as figs are), from fig (n.1) + -y (2). From 1846 (in a book of Cornish words) as "full of figs or raisins." The figgy pudding of the Christmas carol is a dish of dried figs stewed in wine that dates back to the Middle Ages but was more often associated with Lent than Christmas.

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tiramisu (n.)

also tirami su, rich dessert made from coffee-soaked biscuits layered with sweet cream cheese, by 1983, from Italian tirami su, literally "pick me up." Said to have been invented 1960s by a restaurateur in the Veneto. Italian tirare "to pull, tug" is from Medieval Latin, from Vulgar Latin *tirāre, which is of unknown origin, possibly from Germanic.

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panettone 

"type of sweet Italian bread," a specialty of the Lombardy region, made with candied fruit, etc., popular at holidays, by 1904, from Milanese dialect panatton (itself attested as an Italian word in English by 1862), a variant, probably augmentative, form of Italian pane "bread," from Latin panis "bread," from PIE root *pa- "to feed." 

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Sally 

fem. proper name, an alteration of Sarah (compare Hal from Harry, Moll from Mary, etc.). Sally Lunn cakes (by 1780), sweet and spongy, supposedly were named for the young woman in Bath who first made them and sold them in the streets. Sally Ann as a nickname for Salvation Army is recorded from 1927.

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mellifluous (adj.)

early 15c., "sweet as honey, pleasing, sweetly or smoothly flowing" (of an odor, a style of speaking or writing, etc.), from Late Latin mellifluus "flowing with (or as if with) honey," from Latin mel (genitive mellis) "honey" (related to Greek meli "honey;" from PIE root *melit- "honey") + -fluus "flowing," from fluere "to flow" (see fluent). Related: Melifluously; melifluousness.

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