Etymology
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ballgame (n.)

also ball-game, "game played with a ball; one contest at such a game," 1848, from ball (n.1) + game (n.). Also later, in general figurative use, "a particular situation" (by 1968).

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living room (n.)

"room set up for ordinary family or social use, sitting-room," 1795 (as opposed to bedroom, dining room, etc.); from living (n.) + room (n.).

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corn-husking (n.)

"social meeting of friends and neighbors at a farmer's barn to assist in husking of the newly harvested Indian corn," 1818, American English, from corn (n.1) + husk (v.). Corn-husker is from 1849.

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lieu (n.)

late 13c., usually as part of the phrase in lieu of "in the place, room, or stead of," from Old French lieu, lou "place, position, situation, rank" (10c.) from Latin locum (nominative locus) "a place" (see locus).

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laborer (n.)

mid-14c., "manual worker," especially an unskilled one, agent noun from labor (v.). Meaning "member of the working class, member of the lowest social rank" is from c. 1400 (compare labour).

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counseling (n.)

also counselling, early 14c., "the giving or taking of counsel," verbal noun from counsel (v.). Meaning "the giving of professional advice on social or psychological problems" is attested by 1928. 

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sense (v.)

1590s, "perceive (an object) by the senses," from sense (n.). The meaning "be conscious inwardly of" (one's state or condition) is from 1680s. The sense of "perceive or understand (a fact or situation) not by direct perception" is from 1872. Related: Sensed; sensing.

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scenario (n.)

1868, "sketch of the plot of a dramatic work," from Italian scenario, from Late Latin scenarius "of stage scenes," from Latin scena "scene" (see scene); earlier in nativized form scenary (1690s). The meaning "imagined situation" is recorded by 1960, in reference to hypothetical nuclear wars.

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ethno- 

word-forming element meaning "race, culture," from Greek ethnos "people, nation, class, caste, tribe; a number of people accustomed to live together" (see ethnic). Used to form modern compounds in the social sciences.

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referral (n.)

1920, "act of referring," from refer + -al (2). Especially to an expert or specialist, for advice (a sense attested by 1955 in social work). Earlier word was referment (1550s), and compare reference (n.).

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