Etymology
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situational (adj.)
1903, from situation + -al. Related: Situationally. Situational ethics attested from 1969 (situation ethics first attested 1955).
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in situ 
1740, Latin, literally "in its (original) place or position," from ablative of situs "site" (see site (n.)).
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off-site (adj.)

"occurring away from a site," 1956, from off (prep.) + site (n.).

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try (v.)
c. 1300, "examine judiciously, discover by evaluation, test;" mid-14c., "sit in judgment of," also "attempt to do," from Anglo-French trier (13c.), from Old French trier "to pick out, cull" (12c.), from Gallo-Roman *triare, of unknown origin. The ground sense is "separate out (the good) by examination." Sense of "subject to some strain" (of patience, endurance, etc.) is recorded from 1530s. To try on "test the fit of a garment" is from 1690s; to try (something) on for size in the figurative sense is recorded by 1946. Try and instead of try to is recorded from 1680s.
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sanhedrim (n.)

supreme council and highest ecclesiastical and judicial tribunal of the ancient Jews, 1580s, from Late Hebrew sanhedrin (gedola) "(great) council," from Greek synedrion "assembly, council," literally "sitting together," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + hedra "seat" (from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit"). Compare cathedral.

Abolished at the destruction of Jerusalem, C.E. 70. The proper form is sanhedrin; the error began as a false correction when the Greek word was taken into Mishanic Hebrew, where -in is a form of the plural suffix of which -im is the more exact form.

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centrist (n.)

1872, from French centriste, from centre (see center (n.)). Originally in English with reference to French politics; general application to other political situations is by 1889.

Where M. St. Hilaire is seen to most advantage, however, is when quietly nursing one of that weak-kneed congregation who sit in the middle of the House, and call themselves "Centrists." A French Centrist is—exceptis eoccipiendis—a man who has never been able to make up his mind, nor is likely to. ["Men of the Third Republic," London, 1873]
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assessor (n.)
late 14c., "assistant or adviser to a judge or magistrate," from Old French assessor "assistant judge, assessor (in court)" (12c., Modern French assesseur) and directly from Latin assessor "an assistant, aid; an assistant judge," in Late Latin "one who assesses taxes," literally "a sitter-by, one who sits by (another)," agent noun from past participle stem of assidere "to sit beside" (see assess). From 1610s as "one who assesses taxes." Milton uses it in the literal Latin sense in "Paradise Lost," calling Christ the Assessor of God's throne.
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flare-up (n.)

"a sudden burst," 1827 of an argument; 1858 of light, from verbal phrase; see flare (v.) + up (adv.). It seems to have had some vogue as a street expression in London in the 1830s.

Flare up! flare up! is all the cry, in every square and street —
No other sound salutes your ear, whoe'er you chance to meet
Where'er you ride, or walk, or sit, or breakfast, dine, or sup,
They welcome you or quiz you with "Flare up, my boy! flare up!"
[Fraser's Magazine, April 1834]
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sartorial (adj.)

"pertaining to a tailor," 1807, from Modern Latin sartorius, from Late Latin sartor "tailor" (source also of French sartre "tailor"), literally "patcher, mender," from Latin sart-, past participle stem of sarcire "to patch, mend" (from PIE root *srko- "to make whole, make good"). The classical Latin word was sarcinator (fem. sarcinatrix).

 Earlier in English in same sense was sartorian (1660s). Sartorius as the name of the long leg muscle (1704) is because it is used in crossing the legs to bring them into the position needed to sit like a tailor. Related: Sartorially.

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