Etymology
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reallocate (v.)

also re-allocate, "apportion or assign again," by 1868, from re- "back, again" + allocate. Related: Reallocated; reallocating.

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realign (v.)

also re-align, by 1876 in reference to railroad tracks, "align again or anew," from re- "back, again" + align or else a back-formation from realignment. By 1923 in reference to European international relations, "return to previously aligned positions." Related: Realigned; realigning.

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realm (n.)

c. 1300, reaume, "kingdom, domain under a sovereign, royal jurisdiction," from Old French reaume, laterrealme, variants (in part by influence of Old French reial "regal," from Latin  regalis) of roiaume "kingdom."

This is possibly from a Gallo-Romance *regiminem, "formed as an accusative on Latin regimen government, rule" [Barnhart; see regimen], or from or as if from Vulgar Latin *regalimen "a kingdom," from Latin regalis [Century Dictionary, OED; see regal], or some combination of the two [Klein]. Realty and royalty tended to come out of Old French in similar forms, and roylty in Middle English also could be spelled realty. (14c., from Old French reaute, realte).

The modern spelling predominates from c. 1600. Transferred or figurative sense of "sphere of activity; area of power, influence, or operation" is from late 14c.

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self-realization (n.)

"the making actual, by an exertion of will, that which lies dormant in one's soul; the fulfilment, by one's own effort, of the potential in one's soul," 1839, from self- + realization.

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realise (v.)
chiefly British English spelling of realize; for suffix, see -ize. Related: Realisation; realised; realising.
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realizable (adj.)

"that may be realized" in any sense, 1847; see realize + -able.

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reallocation (n.)

also re-allocation, "an apportioning or assigning again; that which is reallocated," 1931, noun of action from reallocate (v.).

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impanate (adj.)
"present in the (consecrated) bread," 1540s, from Church Latin impanatus, past participle of impanare "to embody in bread," from assmiliated form of in- "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + panis "bread," from PIE root *pa- "to feed." Related: Impanation (1540s), from Medieval Latin impanationem. The Adessenarians (1751, from Latin adesse "be present," from ad- "to" + esse "be") believed in the real presence of Christ's body in the eucharist, not by transubstantiation but by impanation.
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very (adj.)
late 13c., verray "true, real, genuine," later "actual, sheer" (late 14c.), from Anglo-French verrai, Old French verai "true, truthful, sincere; right, just, legal," from Vulgar Latin *veracus, from Latin verax (genitive veracis) "truthful," from verus "true" (source also of Italian vero), from PIE root *were-o- "true, trustworthy." Meaning "greatly, extremely" is first recorded mid-15c. Used as a pure intensive since Middle English.
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sooth (n.)
Old English soð "truth, justice, righteousness, rectitude; reality, certainty," noun use of soð (adj.) "true, genuine, real; just, righteous," originally *sonð-, from Proto-Germanic *santhaz (source also of Old Norse sannr, Old Saxon soth, Old High German sand "true," Gothic sunja "truth").

The group is related to Old English synn "sin" and Latin sontis "guilty" (truth is related to guilt via "being the one;" see sin (v.)), from PIE *hes-ont- "being, existence," thus "real, true" (from present participle of root *es- "to be"), also preserved in Latin sunt "they are" and German sind.

Archaic in English, it is the root of modern words for "true" in Swedish (sann) and Danish (sand). In common use until mid-17c., then obsolete until revived as an archaism early 19c. by Scott, etc. Used for Latin pro- in translating compounds into Old English, such as soðtacen "prodigy," soðfylgan "prosequi."
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