Etymology
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fore-ordained (adj.)
also foreordained, early 15c., for-ordenede, past pariticiple of for-ordeinen "to arrange or plan beforehand" (see fore-ordain).
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yokel (n.)
1812, perhaps from dialectal German Jokel, disparaging name for a farmer, originally diminutive of Jakob. Or perhaps from English yokel, dialectal name for "woodpecker."
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Saul 
masc. proper name, Biblical first king of Israel, from Latin Saul, from Hebrew Shaul, literally "asked for," passive participle of sha'al "he asked for."
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gratis (adv.)

mid-15c., "for nothing, freely," from Latin gratis, contraction of gratiis "for thanks," hence, "without recompense, for nothing," ablative of gratiae "thanks," plural of gratia "favor" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor"). Meaning "free of charge" is 1540s.

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merlot (n.)

grape variety used for producing red wine, by 1828, generally said to be from French merle "blackbird," from Latin merola, but the reason for the name being given to the grapes is obscure; perhaps from a supposed fondness of the birds for the grapes, or from the dark color of the wine made from it. 

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synecdoche (n.)
"figure of speech in which a part is taken for the whole or vice versa," late 15c. correction of synodoches (late 14c.), from Medieval Latin synodoche, alteration of Late Latin synecdoche, from Greek synekdokhe "the putting of a whole for a part; an understanding one with another," literally "a receiving together or jointly," from synekdekhesthai "supply a thought or word; take with something else, join in receiving," from syn- "with" (see syn-) + ek "out" (see ex-) + dekhesthai "to receive," related to dokein "seem good" (from PIE root *dek- "to take, accept"). Typically an attribute or adjunct substituted for the thing meant ("head" for "cattle," "hands" for "workmen," "wheels" for "automobile," etc.). Compare metonymy. Related: Synecdochical.
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crying (adj.)

late 14c., "roaring, shouting;" 1590s, "wailing, weeping," present-participle adjective from cry (v.). Sense of "demanding attention or remedy" is from c. 1600. U.S. colloquial expression of disgust, impatience, etc., for crying out loud, is by 1921, probably a euphemism for for Christ's sake.

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urinal (n.)
c. 1200, "glass vial to receive urine for medical inspection," from Old French urinal, from Late Latin urinal, from urinalis (adj.) "relating to urine," from Latin urina (see urine). Meaning "chamber pot" is from late 15c. Modern sense of "fixture for urinating (for men)" is attested from 1851.
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doll (n.)

1550s, Doll, an endearing name for a female pet or a mistress, from the familiar form of the fem. proper name Dorothy (q.v.). The -l- for -r- substitution in nicknames is common in English: compare Hal for Harold, Moll for Mary, Sally for Sarah, etc. 

From 1610s in old slang in a general sense of "sweetheart, mistress, paramour;" by 1640s it had degenerated to "slattern." Sense of "a child's toy baby" is by 1700. Transferred back to living beings by 1778 in the sense of "pretty, silly woman." By mid-20c. it had come full circle and was used again in slang as an endearing or patronizing name for a young woman.

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e.r.a. (n.)
1949 in baseball as initialism (acronym) for earned run average. From 1971 in U.S. politics for Equal Rights Amendment.
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