Etymology
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pagination (n.)

"action of marking page numbers; figures or marks on pages by which their order is indicated," by 1823, probably from French pagination (by 1799), from Latin pagina "page of a book" (see page (n.1)). In printing, page also meant "types and cuts properly arranged for printing a leaf of a book or pamphlet."

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pagoda (n.)

1580s, in Burma, India, Siam, China, etc., "a sacred tower, richly adorned," pagode, pagody (modern form from 1630s), from Portuguese pagode (early 16c.), perhaps from a corruption of Persian butkada, from but "idol" + kada "dwelling." Or perhaps from or influenced by Tamil pagavadi "house belonging to a deity," from Sanskrit bhagavati "goddess," fem. of bhagavat "blessed, adorable," from *bhagah "good fortune," from PIE root *bhag- "to share out, apportion; to get a share."

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Pahlavi (n.)

1773, Iranian language spoken in Persia 3c.-10c., the language of the sacred books of the Zoroastrians, from Persian Pahlavi, from Old Persian Parthava "Parthia" (see Parthian).

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pahoehoe (n.)

"compacy, ropy lava," 1859, from Hawaiian, literally "smooth, polished."

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Paige 
fem. proper name, also a family name, variant of page (n.2) "young servant."
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pail (n.)

"cylindrical bucket," mid-14c., paile, probably from Old French paele, paelle "cooking or frying pan, warming pan;" also a liquid measure, from Latin patella "small pan, little dish, platter," diminutive of patina "broad shallow pan, stew-pan" (see pan (n.)).

The sense evolution might have been affected by Old English pægel "wine vessel," but etymology does not support a direct connection. This Old English word possibly is from Medieval Latin pagella "a measure," from Latin pagella "column," diminutive of pagina "page, leaf of paper, strip of papyrus fastened to others" (see page (n.1)).

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pain (v.)

c. 1300, peinen, "to exert or strain oneself, strive; endeavor," from Old French pener (v.) "to hurt, cause pain," from peine, and from Middle English peine (n.); see pain (n.). Transitive meaning "cause pain; inflict pain" is from late 14c. That of "to cause sorrow, grief, or unhappiness" also is from late 14c. In Middle English also "to punish for an offense or fault; to torture, to torment." Related: Pained; paining.

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pain (n.)

late 13c., peine, "the agony suffered by Christ;" c. 1300, "punishment," especially for a crime, "legal punishment of any sort" (including fines and monetary penalties); also "condition one feels when hurt, opposite of pleasure," including mental or emotional suffering, grief, distress; from Old French peine "difficulty, woe, suffering, punishment, Hell's torments" (11c.), from Latin poena "punishment, penalty, retribution, indemnification" (in Late Latin also "torment, hardship, suffering"), from Greek poinē "retribution, penalty, quit-money for spilled blood," from PIE *kwei- "to pay, atone, compensate" (see penal).

The early "punishment" sense in English survives in phrase on pain of death. Also c. 1300 the word was used for the torments of eternal damnation after death. The sense of "exertion, effort" is from late 14c.; pains "great care taken (for some purpose), exertion or trouble taken in doing something" is recorded from 1520s.

 Phrase give (someone) a pain "be annoying and irritating" is by 1895; as a noun, localized as pain in the neck (1924) and pain in the ass (1934), though this last might have gone long unrecorded and be the original sense and the others euphemisms. First record of pain-killer "drug or herb that reduces pain" is by 1845.

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painful (adj.)

mid-14c., peineful, "characterized by or attended by pain" (originally of the Crucifixion), from pain (n.) + -ful. Meaning "causing physical pain" is from c. 1400; that of "inflicting pain" (of punishments, etc.) is by mid-15c. Related: Painfully; painfulness.

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