Etymology
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F.M. 

1922, abbreviation of frequency modulation as a method of encoding information in radio waves by varying the frequency of the wave. As a method of broadcasting radio programs, it began in the late 1930s and was notable for superior noise reduction and the capability of broadcasting in stereo. As the chosen medium for broadcasting stereo rock music it became popular in the 1970s.

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dissonance (n.)

early 15c., dissonaunce, "disagreement, discrepancy, incongruity, inconsistency" (between things), from Old French dissonance and directly from Medieval Latin dissonantia, from Latin dissonantem, present participle of dissonare "differ in sound," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + sonare "to sound, make a noise" (from PIE root *swen- "to sound"). The etymological sense, "inharmonious mixture or combination of sounds," is attested in English from 1590s.

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fizzle (v.)

1530s, "to break wind without noise," probably altered from obsolete fist, from Middle English fisten "break wind" (see feisty) + frequentative suffix -le. Related: Fizzled; fizzling.

Meaning "make a noise as of a liquid or gas forced out a narrow aperture" is from 1859, "usually with special reference to the weakness and sudden diminution or cessation of such sound" [Century Dictionary], hence the figurative sense "prove a failure, stop abruptly after a more-or-less brilliant start." But this sense is earlier and dates to at least 1847 in American English college slang, along with the noun sense of "failure, fiasco" (1846), also originally U.S. college slang, "a failure in answering an examination by a professor." Barnhart says it is "not considered as derived from the verb." Halliwell ("Archaic and Provincial Words," 1846) has fizzle (v.) as "To do anything without noise," which might connect the college slang with the older word via some notion of mumbled and stifled performance:

In many colleges in the United States, this word is applied to a bad recitation, probably from the want of distinct articulation, which usually attends such performances. It is further explained in the Yale Banger, November 10, 1846: "This figure of a wounded snake is intended to represent what in technical language is termed a fizzle. The best judges have decided that to get just one third of the meaning right constitutes a perfect fizzle." [John Bartlett, "A Collection of College Words and Customs," Cambridge, 1851]
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rut (n.2)

"periodically recurring sexual excitement in animals; animal mating season" (originally of deer), early 15c., from Old French rut, ruit, from Late Latin rugitum (nominative rugitus) "a bellowing, a roaring," from past participle of Latin rugire "to bellow" (from PIE imitative root *reu-). If so, the notion is of the noise made by deer at the time of sexual excitement. The noun rut "roar of the sea" (1630s) in Scottish and persisting in New England dialect is of uncertain connection.

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hue (n.2)
"a shouting," mid-13c., from Old French huee "outcry, noise, tumult; war or hunting cry," probably of imitative origin (compare French hue "gee!" a cry to horses). Hue and cry is late 13c. as an Anglo-French legal term meaning "outcry calling for pursuit of a felon" (the Medieval Latin version is huesium et clamor); extended sense of "cry of alarm" is 1580s.
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storm (v.)
of the wind, "to rage, be violent," c. 1400, considered to be from storm (n.). Old English had styrman, cognate with Dutch stormen, Old High German sturman, German stürmen, Danish storme, Military sense "attack (a place) by scaling walls and forcing gates" (1640s) first attested in writings of Oliver Cromwell. Related: Stormed; storming. Italian stormire "make a noise" is from Germanic.
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charivari (n.)

"rough music, a mock-serenade intended as annoyance or insult," especially as a community way of expressing disapproval of a marriage match, 1735, from French charivari, from Old French chalivali "discordant noise made by pots and pans" (14c.), from Late Latin caribaria "a severe headache," from Greek karebaria "headache," from kare "head" (from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head") + barys "heavy," from PIE root *gwere- (1) "heavy." Compare callithumpian.

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scrunch (v.)

1825, "to bite, crush with or as with the teeth," intensive form of crunch (v.); ultimately imitative (see scr-). The colloquial meaning "to squeeze, crush" is by 1835 (implied in scrunched). The intransitive sense of "contract oneself into a more compact shape" is by 1884. Related: Scrunching. As a noun, "noise made by scrunching," by 1857; as an adjective, scrunchy is attested by 1905. 

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muffle (v.)

early 15c., "to cover or wrap (something) to conceal or protect," perhaps from Old French moufle "thick glove, mitten;" see muff (n.). Compare Old French enmoufle "wrapped up;" Middle French mofler "to stuff." The meaning "wrap something up to deaden sound" is recorded by 1761. Related: Muffled; muffling. Muffled oars have mats or canvas about their shafts to prevent noise from contact with the oarlocks while rowing.

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reverberate (v.)

1570s, "beat back, drive back, force back" (the classical sense, now obsolete), from Latin reverberatus, past participle of reverberare "strike back, repel, cause to rebound" (see reverberation).

In reference to sound or noise, "re-echo," from 1590s, on the notion of "bend back, reflect." An earlier verb was reverberen "send (heat) back" to a part of the body (early 15c., Chauliac). Related: Reverberated; reverberating.

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