Etymology
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civvy (n.)

1889, civvies, short for civilian clothes (see civilian); in reference to civilian clothes of military men.

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candyass 
also candy-ass, 1961, from candy (n.) + ass (n.2). Perhaps originally U.S. military.
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outwork (n.)

"part of a fortification outside the parapet; an outer defense," 1610s, from out- + work (n.) "military fortification." Related: Outworks.

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plain clothes (n.)

"ordinary dress of civil life" (as opposed to military uniform), 1822; in reference to police detectives, it is attested from 1842. Also plainclothes.

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liaise (v.)
1928, back-formation from liaison. Said to have been a coinage of British military men in World War I. Related: Liaised; liaising.
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disarmament (n.)

"action of disarming," by 1795; see noun of action from disarm. Especially in reference to reduction of military and naval forces from a war to a peace footing.

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mechanized (adj.)

also mechanised, in the military sense of "equipped with or using mechanical vehicles and weapons," 1926, past-participle adjective from mechanize (v.).

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ginormous (adj.)
by 1948, perhaps 1942, apparently originally a World War II military colloquialism, from a merger of gigantic + enormous.
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major (v.)

of a college or university student, "focus (one's) studies," 1910, American English, from major (n.) in sense of "subject of specialization" (by 1890). Related: Majored; majoring. Earlier as a verb, in Scottish, "to prance about, or walk backwards and forwards with a military air and step" [Jamieson, 1825] a sense derived from the military major.

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