Etymology
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leuko- 
before vowels leuk-, also sometimes in Latinized form leuco-/leuc-, word-forming element used from 19c. and meaning "white" (or, in medicine, "leukocyte"), from Greek leukos "clear, white," from PIE *leuko-, suffixed form of root *leuk- "light, brightness."
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resin (n.)

hardened secretions of various plants, used in medicine, varnishes, etc., late 14c., from Old French resine "gum, resin," and directly from Latin resina "resin," from Greek rhetine "resin of the pine," a word of unknown origin. Applied to synthetic products by 1883. Related: Resiniferous.

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Nobel 
1900, in reference to five prizes (in physics, chemistry, medicine, literature, and peace) established in the will of Alfred Nobel (1833-1896), Swedish chemist and engineer, inventor of dynamite. A sixth prize, in economics, was added in 1969. Related: Nobelist.
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Ayurvedic (adj.)

"pertaining to traditional Hindu science of medicine," 1917, from Sanskrit Ayurveda "science of life," from ayur "life" (from PIE *oyus-, suffixed form of *oyu- "life everlasting," from variant form of root *aiw- "vital force, life; long life, eternity") + veda "knowledge" (see Veda).

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cleanser (n.)

late 14c., "thing that cleanses" (usually figurative, in reference to purging sin), also "a purgative medicine;" 1560s in a literal sense "one who or that which makes clean;" agent noun from cleanse (v.). Old English had clænsere "priest."

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arrhythmia (n.)
in medicine, "irregularity of pulse" (arrhythmia cordis), 1888, from Greek noun of action from arrhythmos "irregular, unrhythmical," from a- "not" (see a- (3)) + rhythmos "measured flow or movement, rhythm; proportion, symmetry" (see rhythm). Nativized form arrhythmy, in reference to metrics, is attested from 1844.
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layman (n.)
"non-cleric," early 15c., from lay (adj.) + man (n.). Similar formation in Old Frisian lekman, Danish lægmand. Meaning "outsider, unprofessional person, non-expert" (especially in regards to law or medicine) is from late 15c. Related: Laymen.
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regenerative (adj.)

late 14c., regeneratif, of a medicine "having the power to cause flesh to grow again," from Old French regeneratif or directly from Medieval Latin regenerativus "producing regeneration," from regeneratus, past participle of Latin regenerare "bring forth again" (see regeneration). In a spiritual sense from early 15c.

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repressive (adj.)

early 15c., in medicine, "serving to check or suppress, tending to subdue," from Old French repressif and directly from Medieval Latin repressivus, from Latin repress-, past-participle stem of reprimere "hold back, curb," figuratively "check, confine, restrain, refrain" (see repress). Related: Repressively.

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liniment (n.)
"oily liquid for external application," early 15c., a term in medicine, from Late Latin linimentum "a soft ointment," from Latin linire, collateral form of earlier linere "to daub, smear," from PIE root *(s)lei- "slime, slimy, sticky" (see slime (n.)).
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