Etymology
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neurasthenia (n.)
"nervous exhaustion," 1854, medical Latin, from neur- (form of neuro- before a vowel) + asthenia "weakness" (see asthenia). Related: Neurasthenic.
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sclera (n.)

"hard coat of the eyeball," 1886, medical Latin, from Greek sklēra (menix) "the hard (membrane)," fem. of sklēros "hard" (see sclero-).

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pediatric (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the medical care or diseases of children," 1849, from Latinized form of Greek paid-, stem of pais "child" (see pedo-) + -iatric.

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labio- 
word-forming element in medical use since 17c., taken as a combining form of Latin labium "lip" (see lip (n.)).
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psilosis (n.)
"loss of hair through disease," 1837, medical Latin, from Greek psilosis "a stripping of hair," from psiloun "to strip of hair," from psilos "bare" (see psilo-).
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pyogenic (adj.)

"having relation in the formation of pus," 1835, from pyogenesis, medical Latin; see pyo- "pus" + -genic "producing." Related: Pyogenetic (1855); pyogenesis.

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medico (n.)
"medical practitioner," 1680s, from Spanish médico or Italian medico, from Latin medicus "physician; healing" (from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures").
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hypertension (n.)
also hyper-tension, 1863, from hyper- "over, exceedingly, to excess" + tension. Originally in medical use; of emotions or nerves, from 1936.
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philtrum (n.)

dimple in the middle of the upper lip, 1703, medical Latin, from Latinized form of Greek philtron, literally "love charm" (see philtre).

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radiology (n.)
1900, "medical use of X-rays," later extended to "scientific study of radiation," from radio-, combining form of radiation, + Greek-based scientific suffix -ology. Related: Radiological.
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