Etymology
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smaik (n.)
"mean or contemptible fellow," mid-15c., Scottish, now archaic, current c. 1450-c. 1900, perhaps cognate with Old High German smeichari, from smeken "to flatter."
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Reims 

city in northeastern France, named for the Remi, a Gaulish people whose name is said to mean "dominant ones." The former French spelling was with an Rh- (compare Rhemish).

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manicotti (n.)

in cookery, 1946, from Italian manicotti, said to mean literally "hand-warmers, muff," from Latin manicae "long sleeves of a tunic, gloves; armlets, gauntlets; handcuffs" (see manacle (n.)).

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Guinevere 

fem. proper name, also Guiniver, Guinever, Gwiniver; the name is Welsh, said to be from Gwenhwyvar, said to mean literally "white-cheeked," but "Magic Fairy" also has been proposed.

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falafel (n.)

also felafel, popular Middle-Eastern food, by 1951 as a traveler's word, not common or domestic in English until 1970s; from Arabic falafil, said to mean "crunchy."

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-ency 

word-forming element denoting quality or state, from Latin -entia. Derivatively identical with -ence; also see -ancy. The slight difference of sense is that -ence can and -ency cannot mean "an act of ____."

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average (v.)
1769, "to amount to," from average (n.). By 1831 as "find the arithmetical mean of unequal quantities;" 1914 as "divide among a number proportionately" (usually with out). Related: Averaged; averaging.
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ornery (adj.)

1816, ornary, American English dialectal contraction of ordinary (adj.). "Commonplace," hence "of poor quality, coarse, ugly." By c. 1860 the sense had evolved to "mean, cantankerous." Related: Orneriness.

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peyote (n.)

"mescal cactus," 1849, in reference to the mescal made from it, from Mexican Spanish peyote, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) peyotl, said to mean "caterpillar;" the cactus so called from the downy button on top.

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Hedwig 
fem. proper name, German, from Old High German Haduwig, a compound of two words both of which mean "strife, struggle." Second element also that of Ludwig.
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