Etymology
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letter (n.2)

"one who lets" in any sense, c. 1400, agent noun from let (v.).

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omit (v.)
Origin and meaning of omit

early 15c., omitten, "fail to use or do, fail or neglect to mention or speak of, to disregard," from Latin omittere "let go, let fall," figuratively "lay aside, disregard," from assimilated form of ob (here perhaps intensive) + mittere "let go, send" (see mission). Related: Omitted; omitting.

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lease (v.)

late 15c., "to take a lease," from Anglo-French lesser (13c.), Old French laissier "to let, let go, let out, leave" "to let, allow, permit; bequeath, leave," from Latin laxare "loosen, open, make wide," from laxus "loose" (from PIE root *sleg- "be slack, be languid"). Medial -x- in Latin tends to become -ss- or -s- in French (compare cuisse from coxa). The Latin verb also is the source of Spanish laxar; Italian lasciare "leave," lassare "loosen."

Compare release (v.). Meaning "to grant the temporary possession of at a fixed rate" is from 1560s. Related: Leased; leasing. The form has been influenced by the noun, and the modern sense of "to take a lease" might be a new 19c. formation. Lessor, lessee in contract language preserve the Anglo-French vowel.

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letting (n.)

"action of allowing movement or passage of something," early 15c., verbal noun from let (v.). Archaic or legalese meaning "delay, hindrance" is late Old English, from let (n.).

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swimmeret (n.)

1840, from swimmer (n.) + diminutive suffix -let. Related: Swimmerets.

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permissible (adj.)

"allowable, proper to be allowed," early 15c., from Old French permissible (15c.) and directly from Medieval Latin permissibilis, from permiss-, past-participle stem of Latin permittere "let pass, let go; grant, permit" (see permit (v.)).

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cloudlet (n.)

"a small cloud," 1788, from cloud (n.) + diminutive suffix -let.

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applet (n.)

by 1995, a diminutive formation from application + -let.

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platelet (n.)

"a little plate," originally and especially of the disk-shaped corpuscles in mammalian blood, 1895, formed in English from plate (n.) + diminutive suffix -let.

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