Etymology
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laddie (n.)

1540s, Scottish English diminutive form of lad, also a term of endearment.

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lade (v.)
Old English hladan (past tense hlod, past participle gehladen) "to load, heap up, burden" (the general Germanic sense), also "to draw or take up water" (a meaning peculiar to English), from Proto-Germanic *hlathan- (source also of Old Norse hlaða "to pile up, load, especially a ship," Old Saxon hladan, Middle Dutch and Dutch laden, Old Frisian hlada "to load," Old High German hladen, German laden), from PIE *klā- "to spread out flat" (source also of Lithuanian kloti "to spread," Old Church Slavonic klado "to set, place").

In modern use restricted to the loading of ships; past participle laden was active in the language longer, but in 20c. was displaced by loaded (but a distinct word in the literal sense would be useful) except in particular phrases. Compare Lading.
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laden (adj.)
"loaded, weighted down," 1590s, adjective from the original past participle of lade.
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la-di-da (interj.)
mocking affected gentility, 1874, a derisive imitation of the "swell" way of talking. Compare lardy-dardy (1859).
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ladies (n.)

plural of lady (q.v.). Ladies' night (1880) originally was any event to which women were invited at an all-male club.

Every succeeding occasion is usually said to be "the best ever," but for true pleasure, comfort and genuine enjoyment it is doubtful if any occasion has been more truly "the best ever" than the ladies' night of the Paint, Oil and Varnish Club of Chicago, which was given in the Crystal ballroom of the Blackstone Hotel, Chicago, Thursday evening January 26. ["Paint, Oil and Drug Review," Feb. 1, 1911]
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Ladin (n.)
Rhaeto-Romanic dialect spoken in Switzerland and Tyrol, 1873, from Rhaeto-Romanic Ladin (Italian Ladino), from Latin Latinus "Latin" (see Latin (adj.)).
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lading (n.)
early 15c., "act of loading a boat," verbal noun from lade (v.). From 1520s as "that which constitutes a load."
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Ladino (n.)
1889, a jargon of Spanish mixed with Hebrew, Arabic, and other elements, written in Hebrew characters, spoken by Sephardim in Turkey, Greece, etc.; from Spanish Ladino "Latin," from Latin Latinus (see Latin. The Spanish word also had a sense of "sagacious, cunning, crafty," on the notion of "knowing Latin." The Spanish word also appeared in American English in its Central American sense, "mestizo, lighter-skinned mixed race person" (1850).
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ladle (v.)
"to lift or dip with a ladle," 1758, from ladle (n.). Related: Ladled; ladling.
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