Etymology
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Flemish (adj.)
"pertaining to or native to Flanders," early 14c., flemmysshe, probably from Old Frisian Flemische, or a native formation from Fleming + -ish.
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donnish (adj.)

"pertaining to or characteristic of an English don" (pedantic, scholarly), 1823, from don (n.) in the university sense + -ish. Related: Donnishness.

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brutish (adj.)
1530s, "pertaining to animals," from brute (n.) + -ish. In reference to humans, "uncultured, stupid," from 1550s. Related: Brutishly; brutishness.
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slavish (adj.)
1560s, from slave (n.) + -ish. Sense of "servilely imitative, lacking originality or independence" is from 1753. Related: Slavishly; slavishness.
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churlish (adj.)

late Old English cierlisc "of or pertaining to churls," from churl + -ish. Meaning "deliberately rude, surly and sullen" is late 14c. Related: Churlishly; churlishness.

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womanish (adj.)
late 14c., "womanly, feminine; resembling a woman;" of a man or men, "behaving in the manner of a woman, effeminate," from woman + -ish. Related: Womanishly; womanishness.
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peckish (adj.)

"somewhat hungry, inclined to eat," literally "disposed to peck," 1785, from peck (v.) + -ish. Also compare peck (n.2). Related: Peckishly; peckishness.

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roguish (adj.)

1570s, "pertaining to or appropriate to rogues," from rogue + -ish. From 1580s as "playfully mischievous." Related: Roguishly; roguishness.

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apish (adj.)
"inclined to imitate servilely," 1530s; "looking like an ape," 1560s; from ape (n.) + -ish. Related: Apishly; apishness.
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devilish (adj.)

late 15c., "characteristic of or befitting the Devil;" see devil + -ish. Related: Devilishly; devilishness. As an adverb, "wickedly," 1610s.

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