Etymology
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moon-calf (n.)

also mooncalf, "abortive, shapeless, fleshy mass," 1560s, attributed to the influence of the moon; from moon (n.) + calf (n.1). In later 16c., "deformed creature, monster;" from 1620s as "congenital idiot."

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rut (v.)

especially of animals, "desire copulation, be under the influence of sexual passion," late 14c., ruteien, from rutei, probably an Anglo-French form of the noun (see rut (n.2)). Related: Rutted; rutting.

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ye (pron.)

Old English ge, nominative plural of 2nd person pronoun þu (see thou); cognate with Old Frisian ji, Old Saxon gi, Middle Dutch ghi, Dutch gij. Cognate with Lithuanian jūs, Sanskrit yuyam, Avestan yuzem, Greek hymeis.

Altered, by influence of we, from an earlier form that was similar to Gothic jus "you (plural)" (see you). The -r- in Old Norse er, German ihr probably is likewise from influence of their respective 1st person plural pronouns (Old Norse ver, German wir).

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sextet (n.)

1841, also sextette, "work for six voices," altered (by influence of German Sextett) from sestet (q.v.). As "company or group of six persons or things" by 1873.

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wondrous (adj.)
c. 1500, from Middle English wonders (adj.), early 14c., originally genitive of wonder (n.), with suffix altered by influence of marvelous, etc. As an adverb from 1550s. Related: Wondrously; wondrousness.
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manipulative (adj.)

1816, in literal sense "of or pertaining to physical manipulation," from manipulate + -ive. In the sense of "tending to manage by mental influence," especially for one's own purposes, by 1909. Related: Manipulatively; manipulativeness.

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dent (n.)

early 14c., "a strike or blow," dialectal variant of Middle English dint, dunt (see dint); sense of "indentation, hollow mark made by a blow or pressure" is by 1560s, apparently by influence of indent.

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carbonate (v.)
1805, "to form into a carbonate," from carbonate (n.) by influence of French carbonater "transform into a carbonate." Meaning "to impregnate with carbonic acid gas (i.e. carbon dioxide)" is from 1850s. Related: Carbonated; carbonating.
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ancestry (n.)

"series or line of ancestors, descent from ancestors," early 14c., auncestrie, from Old French ancesserie "ancestry, ancestors, forefathers," from ancestre (see ancestor). The spelling was modified in English by influence of ancestor.

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caught 

past tense and past participle of catch (v.), attested from 14c., predominant after c. 1800, replacing earlier catched. A rare instance of an English strong verb with a French origin. This might have been by influence of Middle English lacchen (see latch (v.)), which also then meant "to catch" and was more or less a synonym of catch (as their noun forms remain), and which then had past tense forms lahte, lauhte, laught. The influence would have happened before latch switched to its modern weak conjugation.

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