Etymology
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polymer (n.)

a substance built from a large number of simple molecules of the same kind, 1855, probably from German Polymere (Berzelius, 1830), from Greek polymeres "having many parts," from polys "many" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill") + meros "part" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (2) "to get a share of something").

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fright (v.)

"to frighten," Middle English, from Old English fyrhtan "to terrify, fill with fear," from the source of fright (n.). Old English had also forhtian "be afraid, become full of fear, tremble," but the primary sense of the verb in Middle English was "to make afraid."

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Polydorus 

Priam's youngest son (Homer), from Latin Polydorus, from Greek Polydoros "one who has received many gifts," noun use of adjective meaning "richly endowed," from polys "much, many" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill") + dōron "gift" (from PIE root *do- "to give").

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charge (v.)

early 13c., chargen, "to load, put a burden on or in; fill with something to be retained," from Old French chargier "to load, burden, weigh down," from Late Latin carricare "to load a wagon or cart," from Latin carrus "two-wheeled wagon" (see car).

The senses of "entrust," "command," and "accuse" all emerged in Middle English and were found in Old French. The sense of "rush in to attack, bear down upon" is from 1560s, perhaps through the earlier meaning "load a weapon" (1540s). The meaning "impose a burden of expense" is from mid-14c. That of "to fix or ask as a price" is from 1787; the meaning "hold liable for payment, enter a debt against" is by 1889. The meaning "fill with electricity" is from 1748. Related: Charged; charging.

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plethora (n.)

1540s, a medical word for "excess of body fluid, overfullness of blood," from Late Latin plethora, from Greek plēthōrē "fullness," from plēthein "be full" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill"). Figurative meaning "too-muchness, overfullness" in any respect is recorded by 1700. Related: Plethoric.

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polygon (n.)

in geometry, "a plane figure with numerous angles," 1570s, from Late Latin polygonum, from Greek polygōnon, noun use of neuter of adjective polygōnos "many-angled," from polys "many" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill") + -gōnos "angled," from gōnia "angle, corner" (from PIE root *genu- (1) "knee; angle"). Related: Polygonal.

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shanghai (v.)

"to drug or otherwise render a man unconscious and ship him as a sailor on a vessel wanting hands," 1854, American English, from the practice of kidnapping to fill the crews of ships making extended voyages, such as to the Chinese seaport of Shanghai. Transferred or general sense of "to constrain, compel" is by 1919.

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fylfot (n.)

supposedly a native name for the swastika (used as a decorative device), but only attested in a single, damaged c. 1500 manuscript, and in that it might rather refer to any sort of device used to fill the bottom (foot) of a design. "[I]t is even possible that it may have been a mere nonce-word" [OED].

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inning (n.)

Old English innung "a taking in, a putting in," gerundive of innian "get within, put or bring in; lodge; include; fill up, restore," from inn (adv.) "in" (see in). Meaning "a team's turn in action in a game" first recorded 1735, usually plural in cricket, singular in baseball.

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plebeian (adj.)

"of or characteristic of the lower class or the common people," 1560s in a Roman historical sense, from Latin plebeius "belonging to the plebs," earlier plebes, "the populace, the common people" (as opposed to patricians, etc.), also "commonality; the mass, the multitude; the lower class" (from PIE *ple-, from root *pele- (1) "to fill"). In general (non-historical) use from 1580s.

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