Etymology
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Toyota 
Japanese automaker, begun 1930s as a division of Toyoda Automatic Loom Works, named for the family name of the founder. There seems to be no one accepted explanation for the change from -d- to -t-.
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Pawnee 

Native American tribes of the Caddoan family, formerly inhabiting the plains of Nebraska, 1778, from Canadian French pani, from a Siouan language, such as Oto panyi. They were removed to Indian Territory in 1876.

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Jacuzzi (n.)

type of whirlpool bath, 1961, U.S. proprietary name, from Jacuzzi Brothers, then headquartered in California, who earlier made jet pumps for motorboats. The family immigrated from Friuli in northern Italy.

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mesquite (n.)

type of American shrub of the pea family, found from Texas and California to Chile, 1759, from Mexican Spanish mezquite, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) mizquitl "mesquite." It is noted for its heavy, hard wood.

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forsythia (n.)
1814, coined 1805 in Modern Latin as a genus name in honor of William Forsyth (1737-1804), Scottish horticulturalist who brought the shrub from China. The family name is from Gaelic Fearsithe "man of peace."
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psittacine (adj.)

"of or pertaining to parrots, belonging to a bird of the parrot family," 1826, from Late Latin psittacinus "of or pertaining to a parrot," from psittacus "parrot," from Greek psittakos (also bittakos, sittakē) "a parrot," said to be a foreign word. 

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curcumin (n.)

coloring matter of turmeric, 1838 (by 1805 in German), from Curcuma, genus name for plants of the ginger family, from which the chemical was drawn, Medieval Latin, from Arabic kurkum "saffron, turmeric." Compare crocus.

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manse (n.)

"mansion house," late 15c., from Medieval Latin mansus "dwelling house; amount of land sufficient for a family," noun use of masculine past participle of Latin manere "to remain" (from PIE root *men- (3) "to remain").

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ptarmigan (n.)

bird of the grouse family, 1590s, from Gaelic tarmachan, a word of unknown origin. The unetymological pt- spelling (1680s) began in French and seems to be a mistaken Greek construction (perhaps based on pteron "wing").

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branch (n.)
c. 1300, braunch, "division or subdivision of the stem of a tree or bush" (also used of things resembling a branch in its relation to a trunk, such as geographic features, lines of family descent), from Old French branche "branch, bough, twig; branch of a family" (12c.), from Late Latin branca "footprint," later "a claw, paw," which is of unknown origin, probably from Gaulish. The connecting notion would be the shape (compare pedigree). Replaced native bough. Meaning "local office of a business" is first recorded 1817, from earlier sense of "component part of a system" (1690s).
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