Etymology
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bipartisanship (n.)

also bi-partisanship, "state of representing or being composed of members of two political parties; spirit of openness to cross-party cooperation or agreement," 1895, from bipartisan + -ship.

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rood (n.)

Middle English rode, "a cross; a crucifix," especially a large one, from Old English rod "cross," especially that upon which Christ suffered, from Proto-Germanic *rod- (source also of Old Saxon ruoda "stake, pile, cross," Old Norse roða, Old Frisian rode, Middle Dutch roede, Old High German ruota, German Rute "rod, pole"), which is of uncertain origin.  Perhaps it shares a PIE root with Latin ratis "raft," retae "trees standing on the bank of a stream;" Old Church Slavonic ratiste "spear, staff;" Lithuanian reklės "scaffolding," but de Vaan is doubtful. Probably not connected with rod.

Also in Old English "a pole;" and in Middle English also a local measure varying from 6 to 8 yards and a square measure of land.

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thwart (adv.)

c. 1200, from a Scandinavian source, probably Old Norse þvert "across," originally neuter of thverr (adj.) "transverse, across," cognate with Old English þweorh "transverse, perverse, angry, cross," from Proto-Germanic *thwerh- "twisted, oblique" (source also of Middle Dutch dwers, Dutch dwars "cross-grained, contrary," Old High German twerh, German quer, Gothic þwairhs "angry"), altered (by influence of *thwer- "to turn") from *therkh-, from PIE root *terkw- "to twist." From mid-13c. as an adjective.

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Hakenkreuz (n.)

1931, proper German name for the Nazi swastika (q.v.), literally "hook-cross," from Old High German hako "hook," from Proto-Germanic *hoka-, from PIE root *keg- "hook, tooth."

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Travis 

masc. proper name, also a surname (late 12c.), from an Old French word meaning "to cross over," related to traverse (v.). Probably a name for a gatekeeper or the toll collector of a bridge.

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balance-beam (n.)

1798 as the cross-piece of a scales, 1813 as a type of device on a drawbridge, canal-lock, etc., from balance (n.) + beam (n.). From 1893 as a type of gymnastics apparatus.

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crusade (v.)

1732, "to engage in a crusade," from crusade (n.). The usual way to express this in Middle English seems to have been take the cross (c. 1300). Related: Crusaded; crusading.

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transition (n.)

mid-15c., transicion, in grammar, from Latin transitionem (nominative transitio) "a going across or over," noun of action from past-participle stem of transire "go or cross over" (see transient).

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decussate (v.)

"to intersect so as to form a figure like the letter X, to cross," 1650s, from Latin decussatus, past participle of decussare "to divide crosswise, to cross in the form of an 'X,'" from decussis "the figure 'ten'" (in Roman numerals, represented by X), also "a large copper coin ten times the value of an as," from decem "ten" (from PIE root *dekm- "ten"). Related: Decussated; decussating; decussation. As an adjective, by 1806.

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overstep (v.)

Old English ofersteppan "to step over or beyond; cross, exceed;" see over- + step (v.). From the beginning used in figurative senses. Related: Overstepped; overstepping.

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