Etymology
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gens (n.)

1847, in reference to ancient Rome, "tribe, clan, house (of families having a name and certain religious rites in common and a presumed common origin)," from Latin gens (genitive gentis) "race, clan, nation" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups).

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teleconference (n.)
1952, originally a proprietary name, from tele- + conference. Not in common use until c. 1974.
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incommensurate (adj.)
"not of equal measure; not having a common measure," 1640s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + commensurate.
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unpopular (adj.)
1640s, from un- (1) "not" + popular (adj.). Related: Unpopularly. Less common impopular is attested from 1721.
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unsociable (adj.)
c. 1600, from un- (1) "not" + sociable (adj.). Insociable is older (1580s) but less common.
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majorly (adv.)
by 1887, from major (adj.) + -ly (2). Common in popular U.S. colloquial speech from c. 1995.
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Jock 
c. 1500, variant of the masc. proper name Jack, the by-form of John. In Scotland and northern England it is the usual form. Since 1520s, like Jack, it has been used generically, as a common appellative of lads and servants, as the name of a typical man of the common folk, of a Scottish or North Country seaman, etc.
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rhinovirus (n.)

one of a group of viruses that includes those which cause many common colds, 1961, from rhino- + virus.

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plebeian (adj.)

"of or characteristic of the lower class or the common people," 1560s in a Roman historical sense, from Latin plebeius "belonging to the plebs," earlier plebes, "the populace, the common people" (as opposed to patricians, etc.), also "commonality; the mass, the multitude; the lower class" (from PIE *ple-, from root *pele- (1) "to fill"). In general (non-historical) use from 1580s.

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collapsable (adj.)

"capable of collapsing, made so as to collapse," 1843, from collapse (v.) + -able. Collapsible is more common in modern use.

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