Etymology
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revocable (adj.)

c. 1500, "capable of being rescinded or recalled," from Old French revocable or directly from Latin revocabilis "that may be revoked," from revocare "call back" (see revoke). Alternative spelling revokable was frequent 16c.-17c.

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alarm (v.)

1580s, "call to arms for defense," from alarm (n.) or from French alarmer (16c.), from the noun in French. Meaning "surprise with apprehension of danger" is from 1650s. Related: Alarmed; alarming.

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kos (n.)
measure of distance in India (about 2 miles), from Hindi kos, from Sanskrit krosah, literally "a call, a shout;" thus, "distance within which a man's shout can be heard."
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ecclesiastic (adj.)

late 15c., from French ecclésiastique and directly from Medieval Latin ecclesiasticus, from Greek ekklesiastikos "of the (ancient Athenian) assembly," in late Greek, "of the church," from ekklesiastes "speaker in an assembly or church, preacher," from ekkalein "to call out," from ek "out" (see ex-) + kalein "to call" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout"). As a noun, "one holding an office in the Christian ministry," 1650s (the earlier noun was ecclesiast, late 14c.); the Latin word also was used as a noun in Late Latin.

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so-called (adj.)
mid-15c., from so (adv.) + past participle of call (v.). As a "sneer word" (1980, Safire, who lumps it with self-proclaimed, would-be, and purported), from 1837.
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citation (n.)

c. 1300, "summons, written notice to appear," from Old French citation or directly from Latin citationem (nominative citatio) "a command," noun of action from past participle stem of citare "to summon, urge, call; put in sudden motion, call forward; rouse, excite" (see cite).

Meaning "passage cited, quotation" is from 1540s; meaning "act of citing or quoting a passage from a book, etc." is from 1650s; in law, especially "a reference to decided cases or statutes." From 1918 as "a mention in an official dispatch."

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Jody (n.)
"civilian who is thought to be prospering back home with a soldier's sweetheart, wife, job, etc.," by 1979, said to date from World War II, from masc. proper name Jody, for no clear reason. Hence Jody call.
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nominate (v.)

1540s, "to call or mention by name" (common in 17c., but now rare or obsolete), a back-formation from nomination or else from Latin nominatus, past participle of nominare "to name, call by name, give a name to," also "name for office," from nomen "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name"). Later "to appoint or designate by name to some office or duty" (1560s); "to propose or formally enter (someone's name) as a candidate for election" (c. 1600). It also occasionally was used from c. 1600 with a sense "give a name to." Related: Nominated; nominating.

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route (v.)

1890, of a railroad ticket, "mark for use on a certain route," from route (n.). The meaning "direct (an electrical signal, phone call, etc.) over a particular circuit or to a particular location" is by 1948. Related: Routed; routing; routeing (1881).

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visit (n.)
1620s, "friendly or formal call upon someone," from visit (v.) and from French visite (n.). From 1800 as "short or temporary trip to some place." With pay (v.) since 1650s.
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