Etymology
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-parous 

word-forming element meaning "bearing, producing," from Latin -parus (as in viviparus "bringing forth young alive"), from parire "to produce, bring forth" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure").

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mellow (v.)

1570s, "to ripen, bring to maturity" (transitive), from mellow (adj.). Intransitive sense of "become soft, be ripened" is from 1590s. Transferred sense of "give richness, flavor, or delicacy to" is from 1590s. Related: Mellowed; mellowing.

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report (v.)

late 14c., "to make known, tell, relate," from Old French reporter "to tell, relate; bring back, carry away, hand over," from Latin reportare "carry back, bear back, bring back," figuratively "report," in Medieval Latin "write (an account) for information or record," from re- "back" (see re-) + portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over"). Early 15c. as "to submit" (to an authority, etc.). Meaning "to name someone as having offended somehow" is from 1885.

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phenetic (adj.)

in taxonomy, "arranged by overall similarity based on all available characters," coined 1960, from Greek phainein "bring to light, cause to appear, show" (from PIE root *bha- (1) "to shine") + -etic. Related: Phenetically.

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phyto- 
word-forming element meaning "plant," from Greek phyton "plant," literally "that which has grown," from phyein "to bring forth, make grow," from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow."
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interrelate (v.)
also inter-relate, 1831 (implied in interrelated), transitive, "bring into reciprocal relation," from inter- "between" + relate (v.). Intransitive sense "come into reciprocal relation" is attested from 1912. Related: Interrelating.
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effectuate (v.)
"bring to pass, accomplish, achieve," 1570s, from French effectuer, from Latin effectus "an effecting, accomplishment, performance" (see effect (n.)). According to OED, formed "on the model of" actuate. Related: Effectuated; effectuating.
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nucleation (n.)

"formation of nuclei," by 1855, noun of action from nucleate (v.) "to form into or bring together as a nucleus" (1839), from Latin nucleatus, past participle of nucleare, from nucleus (see nucleus).

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primipara (n.)

"woman who bears a child for the first time," 1842, Modern Latin, from Latin primus "first" (see prime (adj.)) + parus, from parire "to produce, bring forth" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure"). Related: Primiparity.

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originate (v.)

1650s, "to trace the origin of;" also "to bring into existence, give rise or origin to," probably a back-formation from origination. Intransitive sense of "to arise, come into existence" is from 1775. Related: Originated; originating.

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