Etymology
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-pathy 

word-forming element meaning "feeling, suffering, emotion; disorder, disease," from Latin -pathia, from Greek -patheia "act of suffering, feeling" (from PIE root *kwent(h)- "to suffer"). Meaning "system of treatment of disease, method, cure, curative treatment" is abstracted from homeopathy (q.v.).

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menses (n.)
"monthly discharge of blood from the uterus," 1590s, from Latin menses, plural of mensis "month" (see moon (n.)).
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serology (n.)

"study of blood serum," 1907, from sero-, combining form of serum (q.v.), + -logy. Related: Serological; serologist.

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bloodiness (n.)
1590s, "state of being bloody;" 1610s, "disposition to shed blood;" from bloody (adj.) + -ness.
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phlebotomy (n.)

"blood-letting," c. 1400, flebotomye, fleobotomie, from Old French flebotomie (13c., Modern French phlébotomie) and directly from Medieval Latin phlebotomia, from Greek phlebotomia "blood-letting," from phlebotomos "opening veins," from phleps (genitive phlebos) "a vein" (a word of uncertain origin) + tomē "a cutting" (from PIE root *tem- "to cut").

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leukemia (n.)
progressive blood disease characterized by abnormal accumulation of leucocytes, 1851, on model of German Leukämie (1848), coined by R. Virchow from Greek leukos "clear, white" (from PIE root *leuk- "light, brightness") + haima "blood" (see -emia). Formerly also leucemia.
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confusion (n.)

c. 1300, confusioun, "overthrow, ruin," from Old French confusion "disorder, confusion, shame" (11c.) and directly from Latin confusionem (nominative confusio) "a mingling, mixing, blending; confusion, disorder," noun of action from past-participle stem of confundere "to pour together," also "to confuse" (see confound).

Meaning "act of mingling together two or more things or notions properly separate" is from mid-14c. Sense of "a putting to shame, perturbation of the mind" (a sort of mental "overthrow") is from c. 1400 in English, while that of "mental perplexity, state of having indistinct ideas" is from 1590s. Meaning "state of being mixed together," literally or figuratively, "a disorderly mingling" is from late 14c.

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hemophilia (n.)
1848 (also sometimes in Englished form hæmophily), from German hämophile, coined 1828 by German physician Johann Lucas Schönlein (1793-1864), from Greek haima "blood, bloodshed, streams of blood" (see -emia) + philia "to love" (see -philia), here with a sense of "tendency to."
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micrography (n.)

1650s, "description of microscopic objects;" see micro- + -graphy. Related: Micrograph; micrographic; micrographist. From 1899 as "art of writing in very small letters." Also "abnormally small handwriting as a symptom of a nervous disorder."

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anaemic (adj.)
"affected with anemia, deficient in blood," 1843; see anaemia + -ic. Figurative sense by 1898.
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