Etymology
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septentrion (n.)

"the Big Dipper, the seven prominent stars of the Great Bear;" Middle English septentrioun (1530s in reference to the star pattern; late 14c. as "the North," and septentrional "northern," in reference to the sky, is attested from late 14c.), from Latin septentriones, septemtriones (plural) "the Great Bear, the seven stars of the Big Dipper;" also figuratively "the northern regions, the North;" literally "seven plow oxen," from septem "seven" (see seven) + trio (genitive triones) "plow ox," from stem of terere (past participle tritus) "to rub" (from PIE root *tere- (1) "to rub, turn"). Also see Charles's Wain. Related: Septentrional.

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transfer (v.)

late 14c., from Old French transferer or directly from Latin transferre "bear across, carry over, bring through; transfer, copy, translate," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + ferre "to carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry"). Related: Transferred; transferring.

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witness (v.)
c. 1300, "bear testimony," from witness (n.). Meaning "affix one's signature to (a document) to establish its identity" is from early 14c. Meaning "see or know by personal presence, observe" is from 1580s. Related: Witnessed; witnessing.
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conifer (n.)

"a plant producing cones, a plant of the order Coniferae" (which includes pine, fir, and cypress trees), 1847, from Latin conifer "cone-bearing, bearing conical fruit," from conus "cone" (see cone) + ferre "to bear, carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry").

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efferent (adj.)

"conveying outward or away," 1827, from Latin efferentem (nominative efferens), present participle of effere "to carry out or away, bring forth," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + ferre "to bear, carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry"). As a noun from 1876.

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claviger (n.)

"one who carries a key of a room," c. 1600, from Latin claviger, from clavis "key" (from PIE root *klau- "hook") + stem of gerere "to bear" (see gest). Latin claviger also was an epithet of Hercules, from clava "club, knotty branch," which is related to clavis.

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anaphora (n.)

"repetition of a word or phrase in successive clauses," 1580s, from Latin, from Greek anaphora "reference," literally "a carrying back," from anapherein "to carry back, to bring up," from ana "back" (see ana-) + pherein "to bear" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry").

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phoresy (n.)

"association between organisms in which one is carried on the body of another but is not a parasite," 1914, from French phorésie (1896), from Greek phorēsis "being carried," from pherein "to carry," from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children."

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sufferable (adj.)
c. 1300, "patient, long-suffering;" mid-14c., "allowed, permissible;" late 14c., "able to be endured;" from Anglo-French, Old French sofrable "tolerable, acceptable; able to bear or endure," from Medieval Latin sufferabilis; see suffer + -able. Related: Sufferably.
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furtive (adj.)

16c., from French furtif (16c.), from Latin furtivus "stolen," hence also "hidden, secret," from furtum "theft, robbery; a stolen thing," from fur (genitive furis) "a thief, extortioner," also a general term of abuse, "rascal, rogue," probably from PIE *bhor-, from root *bher- (1) "to carry; to bear children." Related: Furtiveness.

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