Etymology
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deschooling (n.)

"act or process of removing the function of education from conventional schools to non-institutional systems of learning," 1970, coined by Austrian-born U.S. anarchist philosopher Ivan Illich (1926-2002), from de- + schooling.

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eldest (adj.)
Old English (Mercian) eldrost "most advanced in age, that was born first," superlative of eald, ald "old" (see old). Superseded by oldest since 16c. Compare elder (adj.).
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Kay 
fem. proper name, often a shortening of Katherine. As a given name for girls, from 1890s in the U.S.; among the top 100 names for girls born there 1936-1945.
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Schmidt (n.)

type of astronomical telescope lens used for photography, 1939, named for Estonian-born German optician Bernhard Voldemar Schmidt (1879-1935), who is said to have invented it.

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Nancy 

fem. proper name, probably a pet form of Ancy, diminutive of Middle English Annis "Agnes" (see Agnes). Among the top 10 popular names for girls born in U.S. between 1935 and 1955.

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Cindy 
fem. proper name, often a familiar or diminutive form of Cynthia, but as a name in its own right among the top 100 for girls born in the U.S. c. 1953-1973.
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fermium (n.)
radioactive element, discovered in the debris of a 1952 U.S. nuclear test in the Pacific, named 1955 for Italian-born U.S. physicist Enrico Fermi (1901-1954). With metallic element ending -ium.
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childbed (n.)

also child-bed, c. 1200, "state of being in labor," from child + bed (n.). In reference to a bed (real or metaphorical) on which someone or something is born, from 1590s.

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permafrost (n.)

"subsoil frozen year-round, as in the Arctic regions," 1943, coined in English by Russian-born U.S. geologist Siemon W. Muller (1900-1970) from perm(anent) frost.

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Laura 
fem. proper name, from Italian, probably originally a pet form of Laurentia, fem. of Laurentius (see Laurence). Among the top 20 names for girls born in U.S. between 1963 and 1979.
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