Etymology
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sackcloth (n.)

"coarse textile fabric worn as penitential or grieving garb," late 13c., literally "cloth of which sacks are made," from sack (n.1) + cloth. In the Bible it was of goats' or camels' hair, the coarsest used for clothing.

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vest (v.)
early 15c., "to put in possession of a person," from Old French vestir "to clothe; get dressed," from Medieval Latin vestire "to put into possession, to invest," from Latin vestire "to clothe, dress, adorn," related to vestis "garment, clothing," from PIE *wes-ti-, suffixed form of *wes- (2) "to clothe," extended form of root *eu- "to dress." Related: Vested; vesting.
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yare (adj.)
"ready, prepared," Old English gearo "ready, prepared, equipped," from gearwian "to equip, prepare" (related to gearwe "clothing, dress") from Proto-Germanic *garwjan "to make, prepare, equip, ready, complete" (see gear (n.)). Cognate with German gar, Dutch gaar. Related: Yarely.
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al- 
in words from Arabic (or assumed to be), it is the definite article "the." Sometimes rendered in English as el-. Often assimilated to following consonants (as-, az-, ar-, am-, an-, etc.). Examples include almanac, alchemy, alcohol, algebra.
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item (n.)
late 14c., originally an adverb, "moreover, in addition," from Latin item (adv.) "likewise, just so, moreover," probably from ita "thus," id "it" (see id) + adverbial ending -tem (compare idem "the same").

The Latin adverb was used to introduce a new fact or statement, and in French and English it was used before every article in an enumeration (such as an inventory or bill). This practice led to the noun sense "an article of any kind" (1570s). Meaning "detail of information" (especially in a newspaper) is from 1819; item "sexually linked unmarried couple" is 1970, probably from notion of being an item in the gossip columns.
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don (v.)

"to put on (articles of clothing)," mid-14c. contraction of do on (compare doff). "After 1650 retained in popular use only in north. dialect; as a literary archaism it has become very frequent in 19th c." [OED]. Related: Donned; donning.

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outgrow (v.)

1590s, "to surpass in growth, grow taller than," from out- + grow (v.). In reference to clothing, etc., "to grow too large for, grow beyond the limits of," by 1690s. The figurative meaning "to become too large or too mature for, leave behind or lose in the process of growth or development" is attested from 1660s. Related: Outgrowing; outgrown.

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buckskin (n.)
c. 1300, "skin of a buck," from buck (n.1) + skin (n.). Meaning "kind of soft leather made from buckskin" was in use by 1793. Formerly much used for clothing by Native Americans and frontiersmen; the word was a nickname for Continental troops in the American Revolution.
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Edwardian (adj.)
1861, in reference to the medieval English kings of that name; 1908 in the sense of "of the time or reign of Edward VII" (1901-10), and, since 1934, especially with reference to the men's clothing styles (as in teddy-boy, 1954, for which see Teddy). From Edward + -ian.
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part of speech (n.)

"a word viewed as a constituent member of a sentence," c. 1500, translating Latin pars orationis (see parse). The parts of speech are: Noun, adjective, pronoun, verb, adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection. Sometimes article and participle are counted among them.

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