Etymology
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imprisonment (n.)
late 14c., from Anglo-French emprisonement (13c.), Old French emprisonnement "capture, imprisonment" (13c.), from emprisoner (see imprison).
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failure (n.)
1640s, failer, "a failing, deficiency," also "act of failing," from Anglo-French failer, Old French falir "be lacking; not succeed" (see fail (v.)). The verb in Anglo-French used as a noun; ending altered 17c. in English to conform with words in -ure. Meaning "thing or person considered as a failure" is from 1837.
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despotic (adj.)

"pertaining to or of the nature of a despot or despotism," 1640s, from French despotique (14c.), from Greek despotikos, from despotēs "absolute ruler" (see despot). By 1734, "unlimited, arbitrary, tyrannical." In 18c. also despotick. Related: Despotical; despotically.

Despotic monarchs sincerely anxious to improve mankind are naturally led to endeavour, by acts of legislation, to force society into the paths which they believe to be good, and such men, acting under such motives, have sometimes been the scourges of mankind. Philip II. and Isabella the Catholic inflicted more suffering in obedience to their consciences than Nero or Domitian in obedience to their lusts. [Lecky, "History of European Morals," 1869]
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slander (v.)
c. 1300, from Anglo-French esclaundrer, Old French esclandrer, from esclandre (see slander (n.)). Related: Slandered; slandering; slanderer.
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advowson (n.)

"right of presentation to an ancient benefice," c. 1300, from Anglo-French advouison, Old French avoeson, from Latin advocationem (see advocation).

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rubble (n.)

"rough, irregular stones broken from larger masses," especially "waste fragments from the demolition of a building, etc.," late 14c., robeyl, from Anglo-French *robel "bits of broken stone," which is of obscure origin, apparently related to rubbish "waste fragments" [OED], but also possibly from Old French robe (see rob). Middle English Compendium compares Anglo-Latin rubisum, robusium.

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empanel (v.)
late 15c., originally of juries, from Anglo-French empaneller, Old French empaneller; see en- (1) + panel (n.).
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Ireland 
12c. in Anglo-Norman, a Germanic-Celtic hybrid, with land (n.) + Celtic Eriu (see Irish (n.)).
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thanage (n.)
c. 1400, from Anglo-French thaynage (c. 1300), from English thane + Old French suffix -age (see -age).
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prosperous (adj.)

early 15c., "favorable, auspicious, tending to bring success;" late 15c., "flourishing, successful, making good progress in anything good or desirable;" from Anglo-French prosperous, prospereus, Anglo-Latin prosperosus, or directly from Old French prospereus (15c.), from prosperer, extended form of prospere, from Latin prosperus "favorable, fortunate" (see prosper). Related: Prosperously; prosperousness.

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