Etymology
Advertisement
doxology (n.)

"hymn or psalm of praise to God," 1640s, from Medieval Latin doxologia, from Ecclesiastical Greek doxologia "praise, glory," from doxologos "praising, glorifying," from doxa "glory, praise" (from dokein "to seem good," from PIE root *dek- "to take, accept") + logos "a speaking" (see -logy). Related: Doxologize; doxological.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
gynecology (n.)

also gynaecology, "science of women's health and of the diseases peculiar to women," 1847, from French gynécologie, from Latinized form of Greek gynaiko-, combining form of gynē "woman, female," from PIE root *gwen- "woman." Second element is from French -logie "study of," from Greek (see -logy). Another word for it was gyniatrics.

Related entries & more 
epilogue (n.)

early 15c., epiloge, from Old French epilogue (13c.), from Latin epilogus, from Greek epilogos "a conclusion, conclusion of a speech, inference," from epi "upon, in addition" (see epi-) + logos "a speaking" (see -logy). Earliest English sense was theatrical.

Related entries & more 
-logue 
word-forming element meaning "one who is immersed in or driven by," mostly from French-derived words, ultimately from Greek -logos, -logon (see -logy). Now mostly superseded by -loger, -logist except in ideologue and a few others. As a combining element meaning "kind of discourse," it is from French -logue, from Greek -logos.
Related entries & more 
neology (n.)

"innovation in language," 1793, from French néologie, from neo- "new" (see neo-) + -logie (see -logy). Related: Neologist (1785); neologize. Neologian (1825) was used especially of "one who introduces needless innovations in language or thought," especially in theology.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
anthropology (n.)
"science of the natural history of man," 1590s, originally especially of the relation between physiology and psychology, from Modern Latin anthropologia or coined independently in English from anthropo- + -logy. In Aristotle, anthropologos is used literally, as "speaking of man." Related: Anthropologic; anthropological.
Related entries & more 
numerology (n.)

"study of the occult meaning of numbers, divination by numbers," 1911, a hybrid from Latin numerus "a number" (see number (n.)) + Greek -logia (see -logy). A correct formation would be arithmology, from Greek arithmos "number." Related: Numerological; numerologist.

Related entries & more 
biology (n.)

"the science of life and living things," 1819, from Greek bios "life, one's life, lifetime" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live;" see bio-) + -logy "study of." Suggested 1802 by German naturalist Gottfried Reinhold Treviranus, and introduced as a scientific term that year in French by Lamarck; they seem to have hit upon the word independently.

Related entries & more 
meteorology (n.)

"science of the earth's atmosphere, scientific study of weather and climate," especially with a view to forecasting the weather, 1610s, from French météorologie and directly from Greek meteōrologia "treatise on celestial phenomena," literally "discussion of high things," from meteōron "thing high up" (see meteor) + -logia "treatment of" (see -logy).

Related entries & more 
etiology (n.)
also aetiology, aitiology, "science of causes or causation," 1550s, from Late Latin aetiologia, from Greek aitiologia "statement of cause," from aitia "cause, responsibility" (from PIE *ai-t-ya-, from root *ai- (1) "to give, allot;" see diet (n.1)) + -logia "a speaking" (see -logy). Related: Etiologic; etiological.
Related entries & more 

Page 9