Etymology
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kinsman (n.)
"man of the same race or family; one related by blood," c. 1200, kenesmen, from late Old English cynnes mannum; see kin + man. Kinswoman is recorded from c. 1400. "The word is commonly and properly used only of a relative by blood, in contradistinction to relatives by marriage, who are properly termed affines" [Century Dictionary, 1902].
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decanter (n.)
vessel for decanting liquors, 1715, agent noun from decant.
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cupping (n.)

1510s, "surgical operation to draw blood by means of a cupping-glass," verbal noun from cup (v.).

There are two modes of cupping: one in which the part is scarified and some blood taken away to relieve congestion or inflammation of internal parts, called wet cupping, or more generally simply cupping; and a second, termed dry cupping, in which there is no scarification no blood is abstracted. [Century Dictionary, 1897]
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cardiovascular (adj.)
also cardio-vascular, "pertaining to both the heart and the blood vessels," 1870, from cardio- + vascular. Cardiovascular system is recorded by 1918.
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angiogenesis (n.)
"development of new blood vessels," 1896, from angio- + -genesis "birth, origin, creation."
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-rigged 

1769, of a vessel, "equipped with rigging" (of a specified sort), from rig (v.).

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hemorrhoids (n.)
plural of hemorrhoid; late 14c., emeroudis, from Old French emorroides (13c.), from Latin hæmorrhoidae, from Greek haimorrhoides (phlebes) "(veins) liable to discharge blood," plural of haimorrhois, from haima "blood" (see -emia) + rhoos "a stream, a flowing," from rhein "to flow" (from PIE root *sreu- "to flow"). Related: Hemmorhoidal.
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menses (n.)
"monthly discharge of blood from the uterus," 1590s, from Latin menses, plural of mensis "month" (see moon (n.)).
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red-blooded (adj.)

1802, "having red or reddish blood," from red (adj.1) + blood (n.). "Specifically noting the higher worms, or annelids, in which, however, the blood is often greenish" [Century Dictionary]. The figurative meaning "vigorous, spirited" is recorded by 1862.

The children born in California are certainly a great improvement upon those born among us. Nowhere can more rosy specimens of health and beauty be found. Strong-limbed, red-blooded, graceful, and as full of happy animal life as young fawns, they bid fair to develop into admirable types of manhood and womanhood. [Bayard Taylor, "New Pictures from California" 1862]
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vasodilation (n.)

1896, from vasopressor, from vaso-, combining form of Latin vas "container, vessel" (see vas) + dilation. Related: Vasodilator (1881).

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