Etymology
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took 
past tense of take (v.), from late Old English toc, past tense of tacan.
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snootful (n.)
"as much (liquor) as one can take," 1885, from snoot (n.) + -ful.
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quarry (v.)

"to dig or take from a quarry," 1774, from quarry (n.2). Related: Quarried; quarrying.

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uptake (n.)
"capacity for understanding, perceptive power," 1816, from up (adv.) + take (v.). Compare Middle English verb uptake "to pick or take up" (c. 1300). Meaning "pipe leading up from the smoke box of a steam boiler to the chimney" is from 1839.
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retake (v.)

mid-15c., "to take back," from re- "back, again" + take (v.). Meaning "to recapture" is recorded from 1640s; sense of "to record a second time" is attested from 1962. Related: Retook; retaking; retaken. As a noun, "action of filming a (motion picture) scene again," it is from 1918; figurative use from 1937.

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resume (n.)

also résumé, 1804, "a summary, summing up, recapitulation," from French résumé, noun use of past participle of resumer "to sum up," from Latin resumere "take again, take up again" (see resume (v.)). Meaning "biographical summary of a person's career" is 1940s.

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overtake (v.)

"to come up to, catch up with, catch in pursuit," early 13c., from over- + take (v.). According to OED, originally "the running down and catching of a fugitive or beast of chase"; the editors find the sense of over- in this word "not so clear." The meaning "take by surprise, come on unexpectedly" (of storms, night, misfortune) is from late 14c. Related: Overtaken; overtaking. Old English had oferniman "to take away, carry off, seize, ravish."

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miffy (adj.)

"liable to 'take a miff,' " 1700, from miff (n.) + -y (2). Related: Miffiness.

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Mstislav 
Slavic masc. proper name, literally "vengeful fame," from Russian mstit' "to take revenge," from Proto-Slavic *misti "revenge," *mistiti "to take revenge," from PIE *mit-ti-, extended form of root *mei- (1) "to change, go, move;" for second element, see Slav.
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shiitake (n.)
1877, from Japanese, from shii, name of several types of evergreen trees, + take "mushroom."
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