Etymology
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loquitur 
stage direction, "he or she speaks," third person present indicative singular of Latin loqui "to talk" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak").
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xylophone (n.)

1866, coined from Greek xylon "wood" (see xylo-) + phōnē "a sound" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say").

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dumbness (n.)

"inability to speak," Middle English dombenesse, from Old English dumbnes; see dumb (adj.) + -ness. As "stupidity," by 1858.

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apologetic (adj.)

1640s, "vindicatory, containing a defense," from French apologétique, from Latin apologeticus, from Greek apologetikos "defensible," from apologeisthai "speak in one's defense," from apologos "an account, story," from apo "away from, off" (see apo-) + logos "speech," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')." Meaning "regretfully acknowledging failure" is by 1836 (apologetic for himself).

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needless (adj.)

"not needed, unnecessary," c. 1300, nedeles, from need (n.) + -less. Related: Needlessly. Phrase needless to say or speak is recorded from early 16c.

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vaunt (v.)
early 15c., "speak vainly or proudly," from Anglo-French vaunter, Old French vanter "to praise, speak highly of," from Medieval Latin vanitare "to boast," frequentative of Latin vanare "to utter empty words," from vanus "empty, void," figuratively "idle, fruitless," from PIE *wano-, suffixed form of root *eue- "to leave, abandon, give out." Also short for avaunten "to boast" (see vaunt (n.)). Related: Vaunted; vaunting.
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univocal (adj.)
1540s, "having one meaning only," from Latin univocus, from uni- (see uni-) + vox "voice, sound, utterance" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak"). Related: Univocally.
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phone (n.2)

"elementary sound of a spoken language, one of the primary elements of utterance," 1866, from Greek phōnē "sound, voice" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say").

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monologue (n.)

1660s, "long speech by one person, scene in a drama in which a person speaks by himself," from French monologue, from Late Greek monologos "speaking alone or to oneself," from Greek monos "single, alone" (from PIE root *men- (4) "small, isolated") + logos "speech, word," from legein "to speak," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')." Related: Monologist.

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horribile dictu 
Latin, "horrible to say, dreadful to relate," from neuter of horribilis (see horrible) + ablative supine of dicere "to say, speak" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly").
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