Etymology
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nitty-gritty (n.)

"basic facts of a situation or problem," by 1961, knitty-gritty, American English, said to have been chiefly used by black jazz musicians, perhaps ultimately from nit and grits "finely ground corn." As an adjective from 1966.

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plowman (n.)

also plow-man, mid-13c. (early 13c. as a surname), "farmer, farm laborer," hence "one of low social status," from plow + man (n.).

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impossibilism (n.)
"belief in social reforms (or other ideas) that could not practically be attained or accomplished," 1885, from impossible + -ism. Related: Impossibilist.
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maladjusted (adj.)

"inadequately adjusted," 1846, from mal- + adjusted (see adjust). In modern use, especially "inadequately adapted to one's social environment" (by 1930).

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taxis (n.)
"operation whereby displaced parts are put back in their natural situation," 1758, medical Latin, from Greek taxis "arrangement, an arranging, the order or disposition of an army, battle array; order, regularity," verbal noun of tassein "arrange," from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle."
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unaccomplished (adj.)
1520s, "not finished," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of accomplish (v.). Meaning "not furnished with social or intellectual accomplishments" is from 1729 (see accomplished).
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dutiful (adj.)

"performing the duties required by social or legal obligation; obediently respectful," 1550s, from duty + -ful. Related: Dutifully; dutifulness. Shakespeare uses duteous.

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clannish (adj.)

1748, "pertaining to a clan; disposed to adhere closely to one another, imbued with prejudices, narrow or restricted in social interests and feeling," from clan + -ish. Related: Clannishly; clannishness.

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living room (n.)
"room set up for ordinary family or social use, sitting-room," 1795 (as opposed to bedroom, dining room, etc.); from living (n.) + room (n.).
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corn-husking (n.)

"social meeting of friends and neighbors at a farmer's barn to assist in husking of the newly harvested Indian corn," 1818, American English, from corn (n.1) + husk (v.). Corn-husker is from 1849.

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